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Title: Status and Performance of the Gemini Planet Imager Adaptive Optics System

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1281699
Report Number(s):
LLNL-PROC-697077
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at: SPIE Astronomical Telescopes and Instrumentation, Edinburgh, United Kingdom, Jun 26 - Jul 01, 2016
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS

Citation Formats

Bailey, V P, Poyneer, L A, Macintosh, B A, Savransky, D, Wang, J J, De Rosa, R J, Follette, K B, Ammons, S M, Hayward, T, Ingraham, P, Maire, J, Palmer, D W, Perrin, M D, Rajan, A, Rantakyro, F T, Thomas, S, and Veran, J P. Status and Performance of the Gemini Planet Imager Adaptive Optics System. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Bailey, V P, Poyneer, L A, Macintosh, B A, Savransky, D, Wang, J J, De Rosa, R J, Follette, K B, Ammons, S M, Hayward, T, Ingraham, P, Maire, J, Palmer, D W, Perrin, M D, Rajan, A, Rantakyro, F T, Thomas, S, & Veran, J P. Status and Performance of the Gemini Planet Imager Adaptive Optics System. United States.
Bailey, V P, Poyneer, L A, Macintosh, B A, Savransky, D, Wang, J J, De Rosa, R J, Follette, K B, Ammons, S M, Hayward, T, Ingraham, P, Maire, J, Palmer, D W, Perrin, M D, Rajan, A, Rantakyro, F T, Thomas, S, and Veran, J P. 2016. "Status and Performance of the Gemini Planet Imager Adaptive Optics System". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1281699.
@article{osti_1281699,
title = {Status and Performance of the Gemini Planet Imager Adaptive Optics System},
author = {Bailey, V P and Poyneer, L A and Macintosh, B A and Savransky, D and Wang, J J and De Rosa, R J and Follette, K B and Ammons, S M and Hayward, T and Ingraham, P and Maire, J and Palmer, D W and Perrin, M D and Rajan, A and Rantakyro, F T and Thomas, S and Veran, J P},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}

Conference:
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  • As adaptive optics (AO) matures, it becomes possible to envision AO systems oriented towards specific important scientific goals rather than general-purpose systems. One such goal for the next decade is the direct imaging detection of extrasolar planets. An 'extreme' adaptive optics (ExAO) system optimized for extrasolar planet detection will have very high actuator counts and rapid update rates - designed for observations of bright stars - and will require exquisite internal calibration at the nanometer level. In addition to extrasolar planet detection, such a system will be capable of characterizing dust disks around young or mature stars, outflows from evolvedmore » stars, and high Strehl ratio imaging even at visible wavelengths. The NSF Center for Adaptive Optics has carried out a detailed conceptual design study for such an instrument, dubbed the eXtreme Adaptive Optics Planet Imager or XAOPI. XAOPI is a 4096-actuator AO system, notionally for the Keck telescope, capable of achieving contrast ratios >10{sup 7} at angular separations of 0.2-1'. ExAO system performance analysis is quite different than conventional AO systems - the spatial and temporal frequency content of wavefront error sources is as critical as their magnitude. We present here an overview of the XAOPI project, and an error budget highlighting the key areas determining achievable contrast. The most challenging requirement is for residual static errors to be less than 2 nm over the controlled range of spatial frequencies. If this can be achieved, direct imaging of extrasolar planets will be feasible within this decade.« less
  • Cited by 7
  • The Gemini Planet Imager’s adaptive optics (AO) subsystem was designed specifically to facilitate high-contrast imaging. We give a definitive description of the system’s algorithms and technologies as built. Ultimately, the error budget indicates that for all targets and atmospheric conditions AO bandwidth error is the largest term.
  • The direct detection of photons emitted or reflected by extrasolar planets, spatially resolved from their parent star, is a major frontier in the study of other solar systems. Direct detection will provide statistical information on planets in 5-50 AU orbits, inaccessible to current Doppler searches, and allow spectral characterization of radius, temperature, surface gravity, and perhaps composition. Achieving this will require new dedicated high-contrast instruments. One such system under construction is the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI.) This combines a high-order/high-speed adaptive optics system to control wavefront errors from the Earth's atmosphere, an advanced coronagraph to block diffraction, ultrasmooth optics, amore » precision infrared interferometer to measure and correct systematic errors, and a integral field spectrograph/polarimeter to image and characterize target planetary systems. We predict that GPI will be able to detect planets with brightness less than 10{sup -7} of their parent star, sufficient to observe warm self-luminous planets around a large population of targets.« less