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Title: A dissolution-precipitation mechanism is at the origin of concrete creep in moist environments

Authors:
; ; ; ; ORCiD logo;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1280203
Grant/Contract Number:
4000132990
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Chemical Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 145; Journal Issue: 5; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2016-12-26 02:56:42; Journal ID: ISSN 0021-9606
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Pignatelli, Isabella, Kumar, Aditya, Alizadeh, Rouhollah, Le Pape, Yann, Bauchy, Mathieu, and Sant, Gaurav. A dissolution-precipitation mechanism is at the origin of concrete creep in moist environments. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4955429.
Pignatelli, Isabella, Kumar, Aditya, Alizadeh, Rouhollah, Le Pape, Yann, Bauchy, Mathieu, & Sant, Gaurav. A dissolution-precipitation mechanism is at the origin of concrete creep in moist environments. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4955429.
Pignatelli, Isabella, Kumar, Aditya, Alizadeh, Rouhollah, Le Pape, Yann, Bauchy, Mathieu, and Sant, Gaurav. 2016. "A dissolution-precipitation mechanism is at the origin of concrete creep in moist environments". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4955429.
@article{osti_1280203,
title = {A dissolution-precipitation mechanism is at the origin of concrete creep in moist environments},
author = {Pignatelli, Isabella and Kumar, Aditya and Alizadeh, Rouhollah and Le Pape, Yann and Bauchy, Mathieu and Sant, Gaurav},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1063/1.4955429},
journal = {Journal of Chemical Physics},
number = 5,
volume = 145,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1063/1.4955429

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 3works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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  • The authors propose that Bahamian whitings, floating patches of lime mud, are in part the result of biological precipitation of calcium carbonate induced by picoplankton and cellular components. The cells may act as nucleation sites for crystallization from seawater supersaturated with CaCO{sub 3}. Their model represents a new hypothesis concerning Bahamian whiting formation and is based on several lines of evidence. Biochemical data suggest that the macromolecules from carbonate suspended in Bahama Banks whitings are distinct from those found in the lime mud sediment producer Penicillus and from bottom sediment. Direct ultrastructural evidence indicates that mineralization occurs on the surfacesmore » of picoplankton cells and degrading organic cellular components. The organic constituents include, but are not restricted to, whole and fragmented algal cell and composite structures {approximately}20-30 {mu}m in diameter. The observed calcium carbonate crystals are distinct from skeletal debris. Because of the magnitude of the whiting phenomenon, calculations of carbonate sediment production budgets should include the potential contribution of calcium carbonate produced by epicellular precipitation. Knowledge of carbonate mud genesis is critical to interpretation of ancient occurrences of lime mud as well as to understanding ancient and global carbon cycles.« less
  • This paper reports results of length change over time of high-strength cement paste, mortar, and concrete in moist conditions. The effect of specimen size, water-to-cement ratio and type and size of aggregate on the water absorption and length change were also investigated. Water permeation depth was calculated based on the increase in mass of the specimen and on the theoretical chemical shrinkage.
  • Debonding of photovoltaic (PV) encapsulation in moist environments is frequently reported but presently not well understood or quantified. Temperature cycling, moisture, and mechanical loads often cause loss of encapsulation adhesion and interfacial debonding, initially facilitating back-reflectance and reduced electrical current, but ultimately leading to internal corrosion and loss of module functionality. To investigate the effects of temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH) on the kinetics of encapsulation debonding, we developed a mechanics-based technique to measure encapsulation debond energy and debond growth rates in a chamber of controlled environment. The debond energy decreased from 2.15 to 1.75 kJ m-2 in poly(ethylene-co-vinylmore » acetate) (EVA) and from 0.67 to 0.52 kJ m-2 in polyvinyl butyral when T increased from 25 to 50 degrees C and 20 to 40 degrees C, respectively. The debond growth rates of EVA increased up to 1000-fold with small increases of T (10 degrees C) and RH (15%). To elucidate the mechanisms of environmental debonding, we developed a fracture-kinetics model, where the viscoelastic relaxation processes at the debonding-tip are used to predict debond growth. The model and techniques constitute the fundamental basis for developing accelerated aging tests and long-term reliability predictions for PV encapsulation.« less