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Title: Review of Biojet Fuel Conversion Technologies

Abstract

Biomass-derived jet (biojet) fuel has become a key element in the aviation industry’s strategy to reduce operating costs and environmental impacts. Researchers from the oil-refining industry, the aviation industry, government, biofuel companies, agricultural organizations, and academia are working toward developing commercially viable and sustainable processes that produce long-lasting renewable jet fuels with low production costs and low greenhouse gas emissions. Additionally, jet fuels must meet ASTM International specifications and potentially be a 100% drop-in replacement for the current petroleum jet fuel. The combustion characteristics and engine tests demonstrate the benefits of running the aviation gas turbine with biojet fuels. In this study, the current technologies for producing renewable jet fuels, categorized by alcohols-to-jet, oil-to-jet, syngas-to-jet, and sugar-to-jet pathways, are reviewed. The main challenges for each technology pathway, including feedstock availability, conceptual process design, process economics, life-cycle assessment of greenhouse gas emissions, and commercial readiness, are discussed. Although the feedstock price and availability and energy intensity of the process are significant barriers, biomass-derived jet fuel has the potential to replace a significant portion of conventional jet fuel required to meet commercial and military demand.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Bioenergy Technologies Office (EE-3B)
OSTI Identifier:
1278318
Report Number(s):
NREL/TP-5100-66291
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; biojet; ATJ; OTJ; GTJ; STJ; biofuel; conversion pathway; aviation fuel; bio-derived jet; biomass-derived jet; renewable jet; feedstock; process economics; life-cycle assessment; greenhouse gas emissions

Citation Formats

Wang, Wei-Cheng, Tao, Ling, Markham, Jennifer, Zhang, Yanan, Tan, Eric, Batan, Liaw, Warner, Ethan, and Biddy, Mary. Review of Biojet Fuel Conversion Technologies. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1278318.
Wang, Wei-Cheng, Tao, Ling, Markham, Jennifer, Zhang, Yanan, Tan, Eric, Batan, Liaw, Warner, Ethan, & Biddy, Mary. Review of Biojet Fuel Conversion Technologies. United States. doi:10.2172/1278318.
Wang, Wei-Cheng, Tao, Ling, Markham, Jennifer, Zhang, Yanan, Tan, Eric, Batan, Liaw, Warner, Ethan, and Biddy, Mary. Fri . "Review of Biojet Fuel Conversion Technologies". United States. doi:10.2172/1278318. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1278318.
@article{osti_1278318,
title = {Review of Biojet Fuel Conversion Technologies},
author = {Wang, Wei-Cheng and Tao, Ling and Markham, Jennifer and Zhang, Yanan and Tan, Eric and Batan, Liaw and Warner, Ethan and Biddy, Mary},
abstractNote = {Biomass-derived jet (biojet) fuel has become a key element in the aviation industry’s strategy to reduce operating costs and environmental impacts. Researchers from the oil-refining industry, the aviation industry, government, biofuel companies, agricultural organizations, and academia are working toward developing commercially viable and sustainable processes that produce long-lasting renewable jet fuels with low production costs and low greenhouse gas emissions. Additionally, jet fuels must meet ASTM International specifications and potentially be a 100% drop-in replacement for the current petroleum jet fuel. The combustion characteristics and engine tests demonstrate the benefits of running the aviation gas turbine with biojet fuels. In this study, the current technologies for producing renewable jet fuels, categorized by alcohols-to-jet, oil-to-jet, syngas-to-jet, and sugar-to-jet pathways, are reviewed. The main challenges for each technology pathway, including feedstock availability, conceptual process design, process economics, life-cycle assessment of greenhouse gas emissions, and commercial readiness, are discussed. Although the feedstock price and availability and energy intensity of the process are significant barriers, biomass-derived jet fuel has the potential to replace a significant portion of conventional jet fuel required to meet commercial and military demand.},
doi = {10.2172/1278318},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Fri Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Technical Report:

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