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Title: Operational Simulation Tools and Long Term Strategic Planning for High Penetrations of PV in the Southeastern United States

Abstract

Increasing levels of distributed and utility scale Solar Photovoltaics (PV) will have an impact on many utility functions, including distribution system operations, bulk system performance, business models and scheduling of generation. In this project, EPRI worked with Southern Company Services and its affiliates and the Tennessee Valley Authority to assist these utilities in their strategic planning efforts for integrating PV, based on modeling, simulation and analysis using a set of innovative tools. Advanced production simulation models were used to investigate operating reserve requirements. To leverage existing work and datasets, this last task was carried out on the California system. Overall, the project resulted in providing useful information to both of the utilities involved and through the final reports and interactions during the project. The results from this project can be used to inform the industry about new and improved methodologies for understanding solar PV penetration, and will influence ongoing and future research. This report summarizes each of the topics investigated over the 2.5-year project period.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Electric Power Research Institute, Knoxville, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Electric Power Research Institute, Knoxville, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Solar Energy Technologies Office (EE-4S)
Contributing Org.:
Tennessee Valley Authority, Southern Company Services
OSTI Identifier:
1274694
Report Number(s):
DOE-EPRI-06326
DOE Contract Number:
EE0006326
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; 14 SOLAR ENERGY; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY; Solar Integration; Strategic Planning

Citation Formats

Tuohy, Aidan, Smith, Jeff, Rylander, Matt, Singhvi, Vikas, Enbar, Nadav, Coley, Steven, Roark, Jeff, Ela, Erik, Lannoye, Eamonn, Pilbrick, Charles Russ, Rudkevich, Alex, and Hansen, Cliff. Operational Simulation Tools and Long Term Strategic Planning for High Penetrations of PV in the Southeastern United States. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1274694.
Tuohy, Aidan, Smith, Jeff, Rylander, Matt, Singhvi, Vikas, Enbar, Nadav, Coley, Steven, Roark, Jeff, Ela, Erik, Lannoye, Eamonn, Pilbrick, Charles Russ, Rudkevich, Alex, & Hansen, Cliff. Operational Simulation Tools and Long Term Strategic Planning for High Penetrations of PV in the Southeastern United States. United States. doi:10.2172/1274694.
Tuohy, Aidan, Smith, Jeff, Rylander, Matt, Singhvi, Vikas, Enbar, Nadav, Coley, Steven, Roark, Jeff, Ela, Erik, Lannoye, Eamonn, Pilbrick, Charles Russ, Rudkevich, Alex, and Hansen, Cliff. Mon . "Operational Simulation Tools and Long Term Strategic Planning for High Penetrations of PV in the Southeastern United States". United States. doi:10.2172/1274694. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1274694.
@article{osti_1274694,
title = {Operational Simulation Tools and Long Term Strategic Planning for High Penetrations of PV in the Southeastern United States},
author = {Tuohy, Aidan and Smith, Jeff and Rylander, Matt and Singhvi, Vikas and Enbar, Nadav and Coley, Steven and Roark, Jeff and Ela, Erik and Lannoye, Eamonn and Pilbrick, Charles Russ and Rudkevich, Alex and Hansen, Cliff},
abstractNote = {Increasing levels of distributed and utility scale Solar Photovoltaics (PV) will have an impact on many utility functions, including distribution system operations, bulk system performance, business models and scheduling of generation. In this project, EPRI worked with Southern Company Services and its affiliates and the Tennessee Valley Authority to assist these utilities in their strategic planning efforts for integrating PV, based on modeling, simulation and analysis using a set of innovative tools. Advanced production simulation models were used to investigate operating reserve requirements. To leverage existing work and datasets, this last task was carried out on the California system. Overall, the project resulted in providing useful information to both of the utilities involved and through the final reports and interactions during the project. The results from this project can be used to inform the industry about new and improved methodologies for understanding solar PV penetration, and will influence ongoing and future research. This report summarizes each of the topics investigated over the 2.5-year project period.},
doi = {10.2172/1274694},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jul 11 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Mon Jul 11 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Technical Report:

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