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Title: Strain-relief by single dislocation loops in calcite crystals grown on self-assembled monolayers

Abstract

Most of our knowledge of dislocation-mediated stress relaxation during epitaxial crystal growth comes from the study of inorganic heterostructures. In this study, we use Bragg coherent diffraction imaging to investigate a contrasting system, the epitaxial growth of calcite (CaCO 3) crystals on organic self-assembled monolayers, where these are widely used as a model for biomineralization processes. The calcite crystals are imaged to simultaneously visualize the crystal morphology and internal strain fields. Our data reveal that each crystal possesses a single dislocation loop that occupies a common position in every crystal. The loops exhibit entirely different geometries to misfit dislocations generated in conventional epitaxial thin films and are suggested to form in response to the stress field, arising from interfacial defects and the nanoscale roughness of the substrate. In conclusion, this work provides unique insight into how self-assembled monolayers control the growth of inorganic crystals and demonstrates important differences as compared with inorganic substrates.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [4];  [3];  [3];  [1]
  1. University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom)
  2. SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)
  3. Univ. College London (United Kingdom)
  4. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1272105
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nature Communications
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 2041-1723
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

Citation Formats

Ihli, Johannes, Clark, Jesse N., Côté, Alexander S., Kim, Yi-Yeoun, Schenk, Anna S., Kulak, Alexander N., Comyn, Timothy P., Chammas, Oliver, Harder, Ross J., Duffy, Dorothy M., Robinson, Ian K., and Meldrum, Fiona C. Strain-relief by single dislocation loops in calcite crystals grown on self-assembled monolayers. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1038/ncomms11878.
Ihli, Johannes, Clark, Jesse N., Côté, Alexander S., Kim, Yi-Yeoun, Schenk, Anna S., Kulak, Alexander N., Comyn, Timothy P., Chammas, Oliver, Harder, Ross J., Duffy, Dorothy M., Robinson, Ian K., & Meldrum, Fiona C. Strain-relief by single dislocation loops in calcite crystals grown on self-assembled monolayers. United States. doi:10.1038/ncomms11878.
Ihli, Johannes, Clark, Jesse N., Côté, Alexander S., Kim, Yi-Yeoun, Schenk, Anna S., Kulak, Alexander N., Comyn, Timothy P., Chammas, Oliver, Harder, Ross J., Duffy, Dorothy M., Robinson, Ian K., and Meldrum, Fiona C. 2016. "Strain-relief by single dislocation loops in calcite crystals grown on self-assembled monolayers". United States. doi:10.1038/ncomms11878. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1272105.
@article{osti_1272105,
title = {Strain-relief by single dislocation loops in calcite crystals grown on self-assembled monolayers},
author = {Ihli, Johannes and Clark, Jesse N. and Côté, Alexander S. and Kim, Yi-Yeoun and Schenk, Anna S. and Kulak, Alexander N. and Comyn, Timothy P. and Chammas, Oliver and Harder, Ross J. and Duffy, Dorothy M. and Robinson, Ian K. and Meldrum, Fiona C.},
abstractNote = {Most of our knowledge of dislocation-mediated stress relaxation during epitaxial crystal growth comes from the study of inorganic heterostructures. In this study, we use Bragg coherent diffraction imaging to investigate a contrasting system, the epitaxial growth of calcite (CaCO3) crystals on organic self-assembled monolayers, where these are widely used as a model for biomineralization processes. The calcite crystals are imaged to simultaneously visualize the crystal morphology and internal strain fields. Our data reveal that each crystal possesses a single dislocation loop that occupies a common position in every crystal. The loops exhibit entirely different geometries to misfit dislocations generated in conventional epitaxial thin films and are suggested to form in response to the stress field, arising from interfacial defects and the nanoscale roughness of the substrate. In conclusion, this work provides unique insight into how self-assembled monolayers control the growth of inorganic crystals and demonstrates important differences as compared with inorganic substrates.},
doi = {10.1038/ncomms11878},
journal = {Nature Communications},
number = ,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}

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