skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Quantifying spatially and temporally explicit CO 2 fertilization effects on global terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics

Abstract

Current terrestrial ecosystem models are usually driven with global average annual atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2) concentration data at the global scale. However, high-precision CO 2 measurement from eddy flux towers showed that seasonal, spatial surface atmospheric CO 2 concentration differences were as large as 35 ppmv and the site-level tests indicated that the CO 2 variation exhibited different effects on plant photosynthesis. Here we used a process-based ecosystem model driven with two spatially and temporally explicit CO 2 data sets to analyze the atmospheric CO 2 fertilization effects on the global carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems from 2003 to 2010. Our results demonstrated that CO 2 seasonal variation had a negative effect on plant carbon assimilation, while CO2 spatial variation exhibited a positive impact. When both CO 2 seasonal and spatial effects were considered, global gross primary production and net ecosystem production were 1.7 Pg C•yr –1 and 0.08 Pg C•yr –1 higher than the simulation using uniformly distributed CO 2 data set and the difference was significant in tropical and temperate evergreen broadleaf forest regions. Moreover, this study suggests that the CO 2 observation network should be expanded so that the realistic CO 2 variation can be incorporatedmore » into the land surface models to adequately account for CO 2 fertilization effects on global terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)
  2. Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA (United States)
  3. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1271473
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1328336; OSTI ID: 1345676
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725; FG02-08ER64599
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Ecosphere
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 7; Journal Issue: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 2150-8925
Publisher:
Ecological Society of America
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; atmospheric CO2; carbon dynamics; gross primary production; net ecosystem production; process-based ecosystem model

Citation Formats

Liu, Shaoqing, Zhuang, Qianlai, Chen, Min, and Gu, Lianhong. Quantifying spatially and temporally explicit CO2 fertilization effects on global terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1002/ecs2.1391.
Liu, Shaoqing, Zhuang, Qianlai, Chen, Min, & Gu, Lianhong. Quantifying spatially and temporally explicit CO2 fertilization effects on global terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics. United States. doi:10.1002/ecs2.1391.
Liu, Shaoqing, Zhuang, Qianlai, Chen, Min, and Gu, Lianhong. Mon . "Quantifying spatially and temporally explicit CO2 fertilization effects on global terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics". United States. doi:10.1002/ecs2.1391.
@article{osti_1271473,
title = {Quantifying spatially and temporally explicit CO2 fertilization effects on global terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics},
author = {Liu, Shaoqing and Zhuang, Qianlai and Chen, Min and Gu, Lianhong},
abstractNote = {Current terrestrial ecosystem models are usually driven with global average annual atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration data at the global scale. However, high-precision CO2 measurement from eddy flux towers showed that seasonal, spatial surface atmospheric CO2 concentration differences were as large as 35 ppmv and the site-level tests indicated that the CO2 variation exhibited different effects on plant photosynthesis. Here we used a process-based ecosystem model driven with two spatially and temporally explicit CO2 data sets to analyze the atmospheric CO2 fertilization effects on the global carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems from 2003 to 2010. Our results demonstrated that CO2 seasonal variation had a negative effect on plant carbon assimilation, while CO2 spatial variation exhibited a positive impact. When both CO2 seasonal and spatial effects were considered, global gross primary production and net ecosystem production were 1.7 Pg C•yr–1 and 0.08 Pg C•yr–1 higher than the simulation using uniformly distributed CO2 data set and the difference was significant in tropical and temperate evergreen broadleaf forest regions. Moreover, this study suggests that the CO2 observation network should be expanded so that the realistic CO2 variation can be incorporated into the land surface models to adequately account for CO2 fertilization effects on global terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics.},
doi = {10.1002/ecs2.1391},
journal = {Ecosphere},
number = 7,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jul 25 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Mon Jul 25 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1002/ecs2.1391

Save / Share:
  • Current terrestrial ecosystem models are usually driven with global average annual atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2) concentration data at the global scale. However, high-precision CO 2 measurement from eddy flux towers showed that seasonal, spatial surface atmospheric CO 2 concentration differences were as large as 35 ppmv and the site-level tests indicated that the CO 2 variation exhibited different effects on plant photosynthesis. Here we used a process-based ecosystem model driven with two spatially and temporally explicit CO 2 data sets to analyze the atmospheric CO 2 fertilization effects on the global carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems from 2003 tomore » 2010. Our results demonstrated that CO 2 seasonal variation had a negative effect on plant carbon assimilation, while CO2 spatial variation exhibited a positive impact. When both CO 2 seasonal and spatial effects were considered, global gross primary production and net ecosystem production were 1.7 Pg C•yr –1 and 0.08 Pg C•yr –1 higher than the simulation using uniformly distributed CO 2 data set and the difference was significant in tropical and temperate evergreen broadleaf forest regions. Moreover, this study suggests that the CO 2 observation network should be expanded so that the realistic CO 2 variation can be incorporated into the land surface models to adequately account for CO 2 fertilization effects on global terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics.« less
  • A 10.6-..mu..m Mach--Zehnder interferometer has been constructed to make temporally and spatially resolved measurements of electron densities in plasmas. The device uses a pyroelectric vidicon camera and video memory to record and display the two-dimensional fringe pattern and a Pockels cell to limit the pulse width of the 10.6-..mu..m radiation. A temporal resolution of 14 ns has been demonstrated. The relative sensitivity of the device for electron density measurements is 2 x 10/sup 15/ cm/sup -2/ (the line integral of the line-of-sight length and electron density), which corresponds to 0.1 fringe shift.
  • We derived a leaf-level factor (L) from a mechanistic model of C{sub 3} photosynthesis: the relative photosynthetic response to a small change in atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration (C{sub a}). The mathematical derivation suggests that L is insensitive to either abiotic or biotic variables but a function of C{sub a}. We used seven sets of experimental data to test this proposition. Despite wide variation in photosynthesis with growth and measurement light levels, growth and measurement temperatures, nitrogen availability, growth CO{sub 2} concentration, and various species, derived values of the L factor converged into a narrow band, confirming that L is anmore » approximate constant at a given C{sub a}. Since C{sub 3} plants are the vast majority in the earth system, the L factor enables us to cut across spatial heterogeneities to bound the increment of global photosynthetic carbon influx (P{sub G}) as stimulated by a C{sub a} increase. We estimated that the increment was between 0.21 and 0.45 Gt (1 Gt = 10{sup 15} g) in 1993, given P{sub G} = 120 Gt yr{sup -1}, due to a 1.5-ppm C{sub a} increase in that year. Using global mean residence time and the increment of P{sub G} we are able to estimate potential global terrestrial carbon sequestration.« less
  • The Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM version 4) was applied to simulate primary production and total carbon storage for two atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations (315ppm and 630ppm) and three climate scenarios (contemporary, 2-dimensional MIT L-O climate model and 3-dimensional GISS). For contemporary climate (Cramer & Leemans dataset) at 315ppm CO{sub 2}, global annual NPP was 47.9 Pg C.yr{sup {minus}1} and total carbon storage was 1658.2 Pg C. Under atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration of 630ppm and projected double CO{sub 2} climate by the MIT L-O climate model, global annual NPP increased by 12%, and total carbon storage increased by 11%. Global annualmore » NPP and total carbon storage under the GISS were about 1% to 2% higher than those under the MIT L-O model. The difference in annual NPP and total carbon storage between the GISS and MIT L-O models varied among the 18 biomes, in the range of 0% to 20%. The differences were greatest in the high latitude ecosystems.« less