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Title: Quantifying spatially and temporally explicit CO 2 fertilization effects on global terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics

Abstract

Current terrestrial ecosystem models are usually driven with global average annual atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2) concentration data at the global scale. However, high-precision CO 2 measurement from eddy flux towers showed that seasonal, spatial surface atmospheric CO 2 concentration differences were as large as 35 ppmv and the site-level tests indicated that the CO 2 variation exhibited different effects on plant photosynthesis. Here we used a process-based ecosystem model driven with two spatially and temporally explicit CO 2 data sets to analyze the atmospheric CO 2 fertilization effects on the global carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems from 2003 to 2010. Our results demonstrated that CO 2 seasonal variation had a negative effect on plant carbon assimilation, while CO2 spatial variation exhibited a positive impact. When both CO 2 seasonal and spatial effects were considered, global gross primary production and net ecosystem production were 1.7 Pg C•yr –1 and 0.08 Pg C•yr –1 higher than the simulation using uniformly distributed CO 2 data set and the difference was significant in tropical and temperate evergreen broadleaf forest regions. Moreover, this study suggests that the CO 2 observation network should be expanded so that the realistic CO 2 variation can be incorporatedmore » into the land surface models to adequately account for CO 2 fertilization effects on global terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)
  2. Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, CA (United States)
  3. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1271473
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725; FG02-08ER64599
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Ecosphere
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 7; Journal Issue: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 2150-8925
Publisher:
Ecological Society of America
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; atmospheric CO2; carbon dynamics; gross primary production; net ecosystem production; process-based ecosystem model

Citation Formats

Liu, Shaoqing, Zhuang, Qianlai, Chen, Min, and Gu, Lianhong. Quantifying spatially and temporally explicit CO2 fertilization effects on global terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1002/ecs2.1391.
Liu, Shaoqing, Zhuang, Qianlai, Chen, Min, & Gu, Lianhong. Quantifying spatially and temporally explicit CO2 fertilization effects on global terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics. United States. doi:10.1002/ecs2.1391.
Liu, Shaoqing, Zhuang, Qianlai, Chen, Min, and Gu, Lianhong. 2016. "Quantifying spatially and temporally explicit CO2 fertilization effects on global terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics". United States. doi:10.1002/ecs2.1391.
@article{osti_1271473,
title = {Quantifying spatially and temporally explicit CO2 fertilization effects on global terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics},
author = {Liu, Shaoqing and Zhuang, Qianlai and Chen, Min and Gu, Lianhong},
abstractNote = {Current terrestrial ecosystem models are usually driven with global average annual atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration data at the global scale. However, high-precision CO2 measurement from eddy flux towers showed that seasonal, spatial surface atmospheric CO2 concentration differences were as large as 35 ppmv and the site-level tests indicated that the CO2 variation exhibited different effects on plant photosynthesis. Here we used a process-based ecosystem model driven with two spatially and temporally explicit CO2 data sets to analyze the atmospheric CO2 fertilization effects on the global carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems from 2003 to 2010. Our results demonstrated that CO2 seasonal variation had a negative effect on plant carbon assimilation, while CO2 spatial variation exhibited a positive impact. When both CO2 seasonal and spatial effects were considered, global gross primary production and net ecosystem production were 1.7 Pg C•yr–1 and 0.08 Pg C•yr–1 higher than the simulation using uniformly distributed CO2 data set and the difference was significant in tropical and temperate evergreen broadleaf forest regions. Moreover, this study suggests that the CO2 observation network should be expanded so that the realistic CO2 variation can be incorporated into the land surface models to adequately account for CO2 fertilization effects on global terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics.},
doi = {10.1002/ecs2.1391},
journal = {Ecosphere},
number = 7,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1002/ecs2.1391

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  • Current terrestrial ecosystem models are usually driven with global average annual atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2) concentration data at the global scale. However, high-precision CO 2 measurement from eddy flux towers showed that seasonal, spatial surface atmospheric CO 2 concentration differences were as large as 35 ppmv and the site-level tests indicated that the CO 2 variation exhibited different effects on plant photosynthesis. Here we used a process-based ecosystem model driven with two spatially and temporally explicit CO 2 data sets to analyze the atmospheric CO 2 fertilization effects on the global carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems from 2003 tomore » 2010. Our results demonstrated that CO 2 seasonal variation had a negative effect on plant carbon assimilation, while CO2 spatial variation exhibited a positive impact. When both CO 2 seasonal and spatial effects were considered, global gross primary production and net ecosystem production were 1.7 Pg C•yr –1 and 0.08 Pg C•yr –1 higher than the simulation using uniformly distributed CO 2 data set and the difference was significant in tropical and temperate evergreen broadleaf forest regions. Moreover, this study suggests that the CO 2 observation network should be expanded so that the realistic CO 2 variation can be incorporated into the land surface models to adequately account for CO 2 fertilization effects on global terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics.« less
  • Climate and the global carbon cycle are a tightly coupled system where changes in climate affect exchange of atmospheric CO{sup 2} with the land biosphere and the ocean, and vice-versa. In particular, the response of the land biosphere to the ongoing increase in atmospheric CO{sup 2} is not well understood. To evaluate the approximate upper and lower limits of land carbon uptake, we perform simulations using a comprehensive climate-carbon model. In one case the land biosphere is vigorously fertilized by added CO{sup 2} and sequesters carbon throughout the 21st century. In a second case, CO{sup 2} fertilization saturates in yearmore » 2000; here the land becomes an additional source of CO{sup 2} by 2050. The predicted atmospheric CO{sup 2} concentration at year 2100 differs by 40% between the two cases. We show that current uncertainties preclude determination of whether the land biosphere will amplify or damp atmospheric CO{sup 2} increases by the end of the century.« less
  • A comprehensive model of terrestrial N dynamics has been developed and coupled with the geographically explicit terrestrial C cycle component of the Integrated Science Assessment Model (ISAM). The coupled C-N cycle model represents all the major processes in the N cycle and all major interactions between C and N that affect plant productivity and soil and litter decomposition. Observations from the LIDET data set were compiled for calibration and evaluation of the decomposition submodel within ISAM. For aboveground decomposition, the calibration is accomplished by optimizing parameters related to four processes: the partitioning of leaf litter between metabolic and structural material,more » the effect of lignin on decomposition, the climate control on decomposition and N mineralization and immobilization. For belowground decomposition, the calibrated processes include the partitioning of root litter between decomposable and resistant material as a function of litter quality, N mineralization and immobilization. The calibrated model successfully captured both the C and N dynamics during decomposition for all major biomes and a wide range of climate conditions. Model results show that net N immobilization and mineralization during litter decomposition are dominantly controlled by initial N concentration of litter and the mass remaining during decomposition. The highest and lowest soil organicNstorage are in tundra (1.24 KgNm2) and desert soil (0.06 Kg N m2). The vegetation N storage is highest in tropical forests (0.5 Kg N m2), and lowest in tundra and desert (<0.03 Kg N m2). N uptake by vegetation is highest in warm and moist regions, and lowest in cold and dry regions. Higher rates of N leaching are found in tropical regions and subtropical regions where soil moisture is higher. The global patterns of vegetation and soil N, N uptake and N leaching estimated with ISAM are consistent with measurements and previous modeling studies. This gives us confidence that ISAM framework can predict plant N availability and subsequent plant productivity at regional and global scales and furthermore how they can be affected by factors that alter the rate of decomposition, such as increasing atmospheric [CO2], climate changes, litter quality, soil microbial activity and/or increased N.« less