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Title: Block Copolymer Membranes for Efficient Capture of a Chemotherapy Drug

Abstract

In this paper, we introduce the use of block copolymer membranes for an emerging application, “drug capture”. The polymer is incorporated in a new class of biomedical devices, referred to as ChemoFilter, which is an image-guided temporarily deployable endovascular device designed to increase the efficacy of chemotherapy-based cancer treatment. We show that block copolymer membranes consisting of functional sulfonated polystyrene end blocks and a structural polyethylene middle block (SSES) are capable of capturing doxorubicin, a chemotherapy drug. We focus on the relationship between morphology of the membrane in the ChemoFilter device and efficacy of doxorubicin capture measured in vitro. Using small-angle X-ray scattering and cryogenic scanning transmission electron microscopy, we discovered that rapid doxorubicin capture is associated with the presence of water-rich channels in the lamellar-forming S-SES membranes in aqueous environment.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [4]
  1. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
  2. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
  3. Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging
  4. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy Technologies Area
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22); National Inst. of Health (NIH) (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
1271469
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1314044; OSTI ID: 1373378
Report Number(s):
LBNL-1005980
Journal ID: ISSN 2161-1653
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231; 1R01CA194533; 1R41CA183327
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
ACS Macro Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 5; Journal Issue: 8; Journal ID: ISSN 2161-1653
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

Citation Formats

Chen, X. Chelsea, Oh, Hee Jeung, Yu, Jay F., Yang, Jeffrey K., Petzetakis, Nikos, Patel, Anand S., Hetts, Steven W., and Balsara, Nitash P. Block Copolymer Membranes for Efficient Capture of a Chemotherapy Drug. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1021/acsmacrolett.6b00459.
Chen, X. Chelsea, Oh, Hee Jeung, Yu, Jay F., Yang, Jeffrey K., Petzetakis, Nikos, Patel, Anand S., Hetts, Steven W., & Balsara, Nitash P. Block Copolymer Membranes for Efficient Capture of a Chemotherapy Drug. United States. doi:10.1021/acsmacrolett.6b00459.
Chen, X. Chelsea, Oh, Hee Jeung, Yu, Jay F., Yang, Jeffrey K., Petzetakis, Nikos, Patel, Anand S., Hetts, Steven W., and Balsara, Nitash P. Sat . "Block Copolymer Membranes for Efficient Capture of a Chemotherapy Drug". United States. doi:10.1021/acsmacrolett.6b00459.
@article{osti_1271469,
title = {Block Copolymer Membranes for Efficient Capture of a Chemotherapy Drug},
author = {Chen, X. Chelsea and Oh, Hee Jeung and Yu, Jay F. and Yang, Jeffrey K. and Petzetakis, Nikos and Patel, Anand S. and Hetts, Steven W. and Balsara, Nitash P.},
abstractNote = {In this paper, we introduce the use of block copolymer membranes for an emerging application, “drug capture”. The polymer is incorporated in a new class of biomedical devices, referred to as ChemoFilter, which is an image-guided temporarily deployable endovascular device designed to increase the efficacy of chemotherapy-based cancer treatment. We show that block copolymer membranes consisting of functional sulfonated polystyrene end blocks and a structural polyethylene middle block (SSES) are capable of capturing doxorubicin, a chemotherapy drug. We focus on the relationship between morphology of the membrane in the ChemoFilter device and efficacy of doxorubicin capture measured in vitro. Using small-angle X-ray scattering and cryogenic scanning transmission electron microscopy, we discovered that rapid doxorubicin capture is associated with the presence of water-rich channels in the lamellar-forming S-SES membranes in aqueous environment.},
doi = {10.1021/acsmacrolett.6b00459},
journal = {ACS Macro Letters},
number = 8,
volume = 5,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Jul 23 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Sat Jul 23 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1021/acsmacrolett.6b00459

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 2works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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  • In this paper, we introduce the use of block copolymer membranes for an emerging application, “drug capture”. The polymer is incorporated in a new class of biomedical devices, referred to as ChemoFilter, which is an image-guided temporarily deployable endovascular device designed to increase the efficacy of chemotherapy-based cancer treatment. We show that block copolymer membranes consisting of functional sulfonated polystyrene end blocks and a structural polyethylene middle block (SSES) are capable of capturing doxorubicin, a chemotherapy drug. We focus on the relationship between morphology of the membrane in the ChemoFilter device and efficacy of doxorubicin capture measured in vitro. Usingmore » small-angle X-ray scattering and cryogenic scanning transmission electron microscopy, we discovered that rapid doxorubicin capture is associated with the presence of water-rich channels in the lamellar-forming S-SES membranes in aqueous environment.« less
  • We introduce the use of block copolymer membranes for an emerging application, “drug capture”. The polymer is incorporated in a new class of biomedical devices, referred to as ChemoFilter, which is an image-guided temporarily deployable endovascular device designed to increase the efficacy of chemotherapy-based cancer treatment. We show that block copolymer membranes consisting of functional sulfonated polystyrene end blocks and a structural polyethylene middle block (S-SES) are capable of capturing doxorubicin, a chemotherapy drug. We focus on the relationship between morphology of the membrane in the ChemoFilter device and efficacy of doxorubicin capture measured in vitro. Using small-angle X-ray scatteringmore » and cryogenic scanning transmission electron microscopy, we discovered that rapid doxorubicin capture is associated with the presence of water-rich channels in the lamellar-forming S-SES membranes in aqueous environment.« less
  • In our study, hybrid gold/iron oxide loaded thermoresponsive micelles were synthesized for combined hyperthermia and chemotherapy, and optical imaging. Polymeric micelles made of amphiphilic block copolymer of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide)-block-poly({var_epsilon}-caprolactone) were conjugated with gold/iron oxide particles which are self-assembled at the hydrophobic polymer core. Thermal sensitivity and magnetic and optical properties of the hybrid gold/iron oxide micelles were investigated for the combined therapy and optical imaging.
  • Composite membranes of a block copolymer of styrene and butadiene (S-B-S) were cast on highly porous, hydrophobic thin films of PTFE and used for the separation and recovery of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from aqueous solutions by pervaporation. Trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, and toluene were the VOCs selected for testing the efficacy of these membranes. An analysis of the pervaporation data showed that the liquid film boundary layer offered the main mass transfer resistance to permeation. The separation factor for the VOCs was as high as 5000 at near-ambient temperatures but decreased substantially at higher temperatures. The water flux was practically independentmore » of the solute concentration. But it increased more rapidly with an increase in temperature as compared to the organic flux, thereby reducing the separation factor. Also, the separation of a multicomponent mixture from the aqueous feed could be predicted well from single-component data.« less
  • As macromolecular surfactants, diblock copolymers order into a variety of morphologies in the presence of a parent homopolymer. Here, we probe the effects of chemical incompatibility and interfacial rigidity on the morphology of copolymer/homopolymer blends at constant blend composition. Five copolymers, each possessing a random-sequence midblock that is varied from 0 to 40 wt % of the copolymer molecular weight, have been synthesized for this purpose. While copolymer micelles are representative of dilute (homopolymer-rich) blends, complex bilayered morphologies, including vesicles and the anomalous isotropic `sponge` phase, are produced upon increasing the midblock fraction. Small-angle neutron scattering provides a quantitative assessmentmore » of characteristic microstructural dimensions, while transmission electron microtomography yields the first three-dimensional images of the randomly connected, bilayered membrane comprising the sponge phase. 31 refs., 3 figs.« less