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Title: Graduate Student Program in Materials and Engineering Research and Development for Future Accelerators

Abstract

The objective of the proposal was to develop graduate student training in materials and engineering research relevant to the development of particle accelerators. Many components used in today's accelerators or storage rings are at the limit of performance. The path forward in many cases requires the development of new materials or fabrication techniques, or a novel engineering approach. Often, accelerator-based laboratories find it difficult to get top-level engineers or materials experts with the motivation to work on these problems. The three years of funding provided by this grant was used to support development of accelerator components through a multidisciplinary approach that cut across the disciplinary boundaries of accelerator physics, materials science, and surface chemistry. The following results were achieved: (1) significant scientific results on fabrication of novel photocathodes, (2) application of surface science and superconducting materials expertise to accelerator problems through faculty involvement, (3) development of instrumentation for fabrication and characterization of materials for accelerator components, (4) student involvement with problems at the interface of material science and accelerator physics.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), High Energy Physics (HEP) (SC-25)
OSTI Identifier:
1271244
DOE Contract Number:
SC0007952
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Related Information: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apsusc.2015.11.064“Tailoring the emissive properties of photocathodes through materials engineering: ultra-thin multilayers”, Daniel Velazquez, Rachel Seibert,Hasitha Ganegoda, Daniel Olive, Amy Rice, Kevin Logan, Zikri Yusof, Jeff Terry and Linda Spentzouris, AppliedSurface Science, 360, p. 762-766, (2016).
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; Electron source; Pulsed laser deposition; photocathode; Quantum efficiency

Citation Formats

Spentzouris, Linda. Graduate Student Program in Materials and Engineering Research and Development for Future Accelerators. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1271244.
Spentzouris, Linda. Graduate Student Program in Materials and Engineering Research and Development for Future Accelerators. United States. doi:10.2172/1271244.
Spentzouris, Linda. 2016. "Graduate Student Program in Materials and Engineering Research and Development for Future Accelerators". United States. doi:10.2172/1271244. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1271244.
@article{osti_1271244,
title = {Graduate Student Program in Materials and Engineering Research and Development for Future Accelerators},
author = {Spentzouris, Linda},
abstractNote = {The objective of the proposal was to develop graduate student training in materials and engineering research relevant to the development of particle accelerators. Many components used in today's accelerators or storage rings are at the limit of performance. The path forward in many cases requires the development of new materials or fabrication techniques, or a novel engineering approach. Often, accelerator-based laboratories find it difficult to get top-level engineers or materials experts with the motivation to work on these problems. The three years of funding provided by this grant was used to support development of accelerator components through a multidisciplinary approach that cut across the disciplinary boundaries of accelerator physics, materials science, and surface chemistry. The following results were achieved: (1) significant scientific results on fabrication of novel photocathodes, (2) application of surface science and superconducting materials expertise to accelerator problems through faculty involvement, (3) development of instrumentation for fabrication and characterization of materials for accelerator components, (4) student involvement with problems at the interface of material science and accelerator physics.},
doi = {10.2172/1271244},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}

Technical Report:

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