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Title: Experiment to Demonstrate Acceleration in Optical Photonic Bandgap Structures

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1270644
Report Number(s):
SLAC-PUB-16664
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Conf.Proc.C110328:2067-2070,2011; Conference: Particle Accelerator, 24th Conference (PAC'11) 28 Mar - 1 Apr 2011, New York, USA
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Accelerators,ACCPHY

Citation Formats

England, R.J., Colby, E.R., Laouar, R., McGuinness, C., Mendez, D., Ng, C.-K., Ng, J.S.T., Noble, R.J., Peralta, E., Soong, K., Spencer, J.E., Walz, D.R., Wu, Z., and Xu, D. /SLAC. Experiment to Demonstrate Acceleration in Optical Photonic Bandgap Structures. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
England, R.J., Colby, E.R., Laouar, R., McGuinness, C., Mendez, D., Ng, C.-K., Ng, J.S.T., Noble, R.J., Peralta, E., Soong, K., Spencer, J.E., Walz, D.R., Wu, Z., & Xu, D. /SLAC. Experiment to Demonstrate Acceleration in Optical Photonic Bandgap Structures. United States.
England, R.J., Colby, E.R., Laouar, R., McGuinness, C., Mendez, D., Ng, C.-K., Ng, J.S.T., Noble, R.J., Peralta, E., Soong, K., Spencer, J.E., Walz, D.R., Wu, Z., and Xu, D. /SLAC. 2016. "Experiment to Demonstrate Acceleration in Optical Photonic Bandgap Structures". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1270644.
@article{osti_1270644,
title = {Experiment to Demonstrate Acceleration in Optical Photonic Bandgap Structures},
author = {England, R.J. and Colby, E.R. and Laouar, R. and McGuinness, C. and Mendez, D. and Ng, C.-K. and Ng, J.S.T. and Noble, R.J. and Peralta, E. and Soong, K. and Spencer, J.E. and Walz, D.R. and Wu, Z. and Xu, D. /SLAC},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {},
journal = {Conf.Proc.C110328:2067-2070,2011},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}

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  • No abstract prepared.
  • An experimental effort is currently underway at the E-163 test beamline at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center to use a hollow-core photonic bandgap (PBG) fiber as a high-gradient laser-based accelerating structure for electron bunches. For the initial stage of this experiment, a 50pC, 60 MeV electron beam will be coupled into the fiber core and the excited modes will be detected using a spectrograph to resolve their frequency signatures in the wakefield radiation generated by the beam. They will describe the experimental plan and recent simulation studies of candidate fibers.
  • Silicon-based 2-D photonic bandgap (PBG) structures have an unmatched potential for integration with well-established microelectronic devices and circuits. They can allow for compact optical devices with enhanced functionality and performance. While a number of passive PBG silicon-based devices have already been demonstrated, electrical tuning of their properties has yet to be implemented. PBG tuning can be achieved by replacing the air inside the device with active optical material, for example liquid crystals (LCs) or an electro-optic polymer. The two main requirements necessary for tuning in PBG structures are (i) the electric field of the control signal should be present insidemore » the active optical material to modify its properties, and (ii) the energy of the optical mode of interest should be distributed inside the active material. While the latter condition can be satisfied by proper optical design, the former requirement is difficult to satisfy due to external electric field screening by the conductive silicon walls. In this work, an analysis of this effect is conducted and guidelines to overcome screening and thus allow for switching are suggested.« less
  • We will describe research conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory towards developing components for controlling terahertz waves. We employ meta-materials and, particularly, meta-films, as very compact absorbers for controlling quasioptical beams. We believe that dielectric photonic bandgap structures could replace ordinary metal waveguide devices at THz, since metal structures become extremely lossy in this frequency range.