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Title: Synthesis and characterization of Fe colloid catalysts in inverse micelle solutions

Abstract

Surfactant molecules, possessing a hydrophilic head group and a hydrophobic tail group, aggregate in various solvents to form structured solutions. In two component mixtures of surfactant and organic solvents (e.g., toluene and alkanes), surfactants aggregate to form inverse micelles. Here, the hydrophilic head groups shield themselves by forming a polar core, and the hydrophobic tails groups are free to move about in the surrounding oleic phase. We have studied the formation of Fe clusters in inverse micelles. Iron salts are solubilized within the polar interior of inverse micelles, and the addition of the reducing agent LiBH{sub 4} initiates a chemical reduction to produce monodisperse, manometer sized Fe based particles. The reaction sequence is sustained by material exchange between inverse micelles. The surfactant interface provides a spatial constraint on the reaction volume, and reactions carried out in these micro-heterogeneous solutions produce colloidal sized particles (10-100{Angstrom}) stabilized in solution against flocculation by surfactant. We have characterized the clusters with respect to size with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and with respect to chemical composition with Mossbauer spectroscopy, electron diffraction, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The synthesis procedure produces high surface area, highly dispersed, unsupported cluster catalysts.

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); and others
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
126776
Report Number(s):
CONF-950402-
TRN: 95:006086-0800
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 209. American Chemical Society (ACS) national meeting, Anaheim, CA (United States), 2-6 Apr 1995; Other Information: PBD: 1995; Related Information: Is Part Of 209th ACS national meeting; PB: 2088 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 40 CHEMISTRY; 66 PHYSICS; IRON COMPOUNDS; SURFACE AREA; SYNTHESIS; COLLOIDS; ALKANES; CATALYSTS; CHEMICAL COMPOSITION; ELECTRON DIFFRACTION; FLOCCULATION; MIXTURES; ORGANIC SOLVENTS; PHOTOELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY; SALTS; SURFACTANTS; TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY

Citation Formats

Martino, A, Stoker, M, and Hicks, M. Synthesis and characterization of Fe colloid catalysts in inverse micelle solutions. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Martino, A, Stoker, M, & Hicks, M. Synthesis and characterization of Fe colloid catalysts in inverse micelle solutions. United States.
Martino, A, Stoker, M, and Hicks, M. Fri . "Synthesis and characterization of Fe colloid catalysts in inverse micelle solutions". United States.
@article{osti_126776,
title = {Synthesis and characterization of Fe colloid catalysts in inverse micelle solutions},
author = {Martino, A and Stoker, M and Hicks, M},
abstractNote = {Surfactant molecules, possessing a hydrophilic head group and a hydrophobic tail group, aggregate in various solvents to form structured solutions. In two component mixtures of surfactant and organic solvents (e.g., toluene and alkanes), surfactants aggregate to form inverse micelles. Here, the hydrophilic head groups shield themselves by forming a polar core, and the hydrophobic tails groups are free to move about in the surrounding oleic phase. We have studied the formation of Fe clusters in inverse micelles. Iron salts are solubilized within the polar interior of inverse micelles, and the addition of the reducing agent LiBH{sub 4} initiates a chemical reduction to produce monodisperse, manometer sized Fe based particles. The reaction sequence is sustained by material exchange between inverse micelles. The surfactant interface provides a spatial constraint on the reaction volume, and reactions carried out in these micro-heterogeneous solutions produce colloidal sized particles (10-100{Angstrom}) stabilized in solution against flocculation by surfactant. We have characterized the clusters with respect to size with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and with respect to chemical composition with Mossbauer spectroscopy, electron diffraction, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The synthesis procedure produces high surface area, highly dispersed, unsupported cluster catalysts.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1995},
month = {12}
}

Conference:
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