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Title: Potent Inhibitors of Acetyltransferase Eis Overcome Kanamycin Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
UNIVERSITYNIHOTHER
OSTI Identifier:
1267465
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: ACS Chemical Biology; Journal Volume: 11; Journal Issue: 6
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

Willby, Melisa J., Green, Keith D., Gajadeera, Chathurada S., Hou, Caixia, Tsodikov, Oleg V., Posey, James E., and Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie. Potent Inhibitors of Acetyltransferase Eis Overcome Kanamycin Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1021/acschembio.6b00110.
Willby, Melisa J., Green, Keith D., Gajadeera, Chathurada S., Hou, Caixia, Tsodikov, Oleg V., Posey, James E., & Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie. Potent Inhibitors of Acetyltransferase Eis Overcome Kanamycin Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. United States. doi:10.1021/acschembio.6b00110.
Willby, Melisa J., Green, Keith D., Gajadeera, Chathurada S., Hou, Caixia, Tsodikov, Oleg V., Posey, James E., and Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie. 2016. "Potent Inhibitors of Acetyltransferase Eis Overcome Kanamycin Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis". United States. doi:10.1021/acschembio.6b00110.
@article{osti_1267465,
title = {Potent Inhibitors of Acetyltransferase Eis Overcome Kanamycin Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis},
author = {Willby, Melisa J. and Green, Keith D. and Gajadeera, Chathurada S. and Hou, Caixia and Tsodikov, Oleg V. and Posey, James E. and Garneau-Tsodikova, Sylvie},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1021/acschembio.6b00110},
journal = {ACS Chemical Biology},
number = 6,
volume = 11,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
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