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Title: A transgenic approach for controlling Lygus in cotton

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
INDUSTRY
OSTI Identifier:
1267458
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Nature Communications; Journal Volume: 7; Journal Issue: 06, 2016
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

Gowda, Anilkumar, Rydel, Timothy J., Wollacott, Andrew M., Brown, Robert S., Akbar, Waseem, Clark, Thomas L., Flasinski, Stanislaw, Nageotte, Jeffrey R., Read, Andrew C., Shi, Xiaohong, Werner, Brent J., Pleau, Michael J., and Baum, James A. A transgenic approach for controlling Lygus in cotton. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1038/ncomms12213.
Gowda, Anilkumar, Rydel, Timothy J., Wollacott, Andrew M., Brown, Robert S., Akbar, Waseem, Clark, Thomas L., Flasinski, Stanislaw, Nageotte, Jeffrey R., Read, Andrew C., Shi, Xiaohong, Werner, Brent J., Pleau, Michael J., & Baum, James A. A transgenic approach for controlling Lygus in cotton. United States. doi:10.1038/ncomms12213.
Gowda, Anilkumar, Rydel, Timothy J., Wollacott, Andrew M., Brown, Robert S., Akbar, Waseem, Clark, Thomas L., Flasinski, Stanislaw, Nageotte, Jeffrey R., Read, Andrew C., Shi, Xiaohong, Werner, Brent J., Pleau, Michael J., and Baum, James A. 2016. "A transgenic approach for controlling Lygus in cotton". United States. doi:10.1038/ncomms12213.
@article{osti_1267458,
title = {A transgenic approach for controlling Lygus in cotton},
author = {Gowda, Anilkumar and Rydel, Timothy J. and Wollacott, Andrew M. and Brown, Robert S. and Akbar, Waseem and Clark, Thomas L. and Flasinski, Stanislaw and Nageotte, Jeffrey R. and Read, Andrew C. and Shi, Xiaohong and Werner, Brent J. and Pleau, Michael J. and Baum, James A.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1038/ncomms12213},
journal = {Nature Communications},
number = 06, 2016,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}
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