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Title: A Microfabricated Flow Cytometry System for Optical Detection of Cellular Parameters.

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1267220
Report Number(s):
SAND2007-1336C
526764
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the Biophysical Society Meeting held March 3-7, 2007 in Baltimore, MD.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Ravula, Surendra K., Branch, Darren W., Sigman, Jennifer, Clem, Paul Gilbert, James, Conrad D., Brener, Igal, Lidke, Diane S., Taylor, Kimberly M., and Oliver, Janet M.. A Microfabricated Flow Cytometry System for Optical Detection of Cellular Parameters.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Ravula, Surendra K., Branch, Darren W., Sigman, Jennifer, Clem, Paul Gilbert, James, Conrad D., Brener, Igal, Lidke, Diane S., Taylor, Kimberly M., & Oliver, Janet M.. A Microfabricated Flow Cytometry System for Optical Detection of Cellular Parameters.. United States.
Ravula, Surendra K., Branch, Darren W., Sigman, Jennifer, Clem, Paul Gilbert, James, Conrad D., Brener, Igal, Lidke, Diane S., Taylor, Kimberly M., and Oliver, Janet M.. Thu . "A Microfabricated Flow Cytometry System for Optical Detection of Cellular Parameters.". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1267220.
@article{osti_1267220,
title = {A Microfabricated Flow Cytometry System for Optical Detection of Cellular Parameters.},
author = {Ravula, Surendra K. and Branch, Darren W. and Sigman, Jennifer and Clem, Paul Gilbert and James, Conrad D. and Brener, Igal and Lidke, Diane S. and Taylor, Kimberly M. and Oliver, Janet M.},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
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