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Title: Mentoring from pipeline to the bottomline.

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1267217
Report Number(s):
SAND2007-0543C
524044
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the Quality Management Conf held February 28 - March 2, 2007 in Dallas, TX.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Tencza, Norbert F. Mentoring from pipeline to the bottomline.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Tencza, Norbert F. Mentoring from pipeline to the bottomline.. United States.
Tencza, Norbert F. Mon . "Mentoring from pipeline to the bottomline.". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1267217.
@article{osti_1267217,
title = {Mentoring from pipeline to the bottomline.},
author = {Tencza, Norbert F.},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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  • Mentoring is an established strategy for learning that has its root in antiquity. Most, if not all, successful scientists and engineers had an effective mentor at some point in their career. In the context of scientists and engineers, mentoring has been undefined. Reports addressing critical concerns regarding the future of science and engineering in the U.S. mention the practice of mentoring a priori, leaving organizations without guidance in its application. Preliminary results from this study imply that formal mentoring can be effective when properly defined and operationalized. Recognizing the uniqueness of the individual in a symbiotic mentor-protégé relationship significantly influencesmore » a protégé’s learning experience which carries repercussions into their career intentions. The mentor-protégé relationship is a key factor in succession planning and preserving and disseminating critical information and tacit knowledge essential to the development of leadership in the science and technological industry.« less
  • Mentoring is an established strategy for learning that has its root in antiquity. Most, if not all, successful scientists and engineers had an effective mentor at some point in their career. In the context of scientists and engineers, mentoring has been undefined. Reports addressing critical concerns regarding the future of science and engineering in the U.S. mention the practice of mentoring a priori, leaving organizations without guidance in its application. Preliminary results from this study imply that formal mentoring can be effective when properly defined and operationalized. Recognizing the uniqueness of the individual in a symbiotic mentor-protege relationship significantly influencesmore » a protege's learning experience which carries repercussions into their career intentions. The mentor-protege relationship is a key factor in succession planning and preserving and disseminating critical information and tacit knowledge essential to the development of leadership in the science and technological industry. (authors)« less
  • This study tested the hypothesis that {open_quotes}There is no statistically significant mentoring variable, or linear combination of mentoring variables, affecting Missouri beginning secondary science teachers` SOC (Stages of Concern) with respect to science laboratory utilization. Demographic data analysis, SOC maximum peak score analysis, item analysis, Pearson r correlation analysis, and factor analysis techniques were applied to data collected from three survey instruments-Science Laboratory Concerns. Mentoring Perceptions, and Demographic-designed for this study. All potential respondents were included in the original mailings. A total of eighty-seven (51.1%) usable responses were obtained. The findings of the study were that four mentoring factors-Professional Assistance,more » Science Laboratory Assistance, Mentor Availability, and Classroom Instructional Assistance-were used to determine mentoring affects upon Missouri beginning secondary science teachers. Also, the most prevalent stage of concern was Stage 4 (Consequences). This indicated that Missouri beginning secondary science teachers were primarily concerned with the impact of science laboratory utilization upon student learning. Mentoring Factor Four (Classroom Instructional Assistance) was found to be significantly related to Missouri beginning secondary science teachers` stages of concern with respect to science laboratory utilization. Individual mentoring items also were found to be significantly related to science laboratory utilization stages of concern. These relationships were both positive and negative.« less
  • {open_quotes}How does mentoring affect Missouri beginning secondary science teachers?{close_quotes} A new theoretical paradigm, the Analysis Hierarchy, was constructed to display the relationships amongst five mentoring classes identified from demographic data analysis. Use of the Analysis Hierarchy enabled the formation and testing of null hypotheses examining perceptions of teacher effectiveness, teacher retention, and teacher use of outside assistance. Mentoring was found to positively affect Missouri beginning secondary science teachers` perceptions of their teaching effectiveness regarding science labs. This effect was significant between content (93.9% of class) and non-content (69.9% of class) mentored teachers. Mentoring was found to positively affect Missouri beginningmore » secondary science teachers` intentions to continue teaching. This effect was significant between mentored (89.3%) of class) and nonmentored (64.5% of beginning secondary science teachers to seek professional assistance outside the mentoring relationship. Demographic trends, indicated content (54.5% of class) and noncontent (69.6% of class) teachers did diverge on this variable.« less