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Title: Glass-To-Metal Seal Development Using Finite Element Analysis: Assessment of Material Models and Design Changes.

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sandia National Laboratories, Kansas City, MO
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1267109
Report Number(s):
SAND2007-0645C
524093
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the 31st International Conference on Ceramics and Composites held January 21-27, 2007 in Daytona Beach, FL.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Tandon, Rajan, Neilsen, Michael K., Mahoney, James F., and Jones, Timothy C.. Glass-To-Metal Seal Development Using Finite Element Analysis: Assessment of Material Models and Design Changes.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Tandon, Rajan, Neilsen, Michael K., Mahoney, James F., & Jones, Timothy C.. Glass-To-Metal Seal Development Using Finite Element Analysis: Assessment of Material Models and Design Changes.. United States.
Tandon, Rajan, Neilsen, Michael K., Mahoney, James F., and Jones, Timothy C.. Thu . "Glass-To-Metal Seal Development Using Finite Element Analysis: Assessment of Material Models and Design Changes.". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1267109.
@article{osti_1267109,
title = {Glass-To-Metal Seal Development Using Finite Element Analysis: Assessment of Material Models and Design Changes.},
author = {Tandon, Rajan and Neilsen, Michael K. and Mahoney, James F. and Jones, Timothy C.},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Thu Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
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