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Title: ABL and BAM Friction Analysis Comparison

Abstract

Here, the Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) program has conducted a proficiency study for Small-Scale Safety and Thermal (SSST) testing of homemade explosives (HMEs). Described here is a comparison of the Alleghany Ballistic Laboratory (ABL) friction data and Bundesanstalt fur Materialforschung und -prufung (BAM) friction data for 19 HEM and military standard explosives.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1266686
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1401368
Report Number(s):
LLNL-JRNL-654961
Journal ID: ISSN 0721-3115
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-07NA27344; AC52-06NA25396; HSHQDC10X00414. LLNL-JRNL-654961 (775550); AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Propellants, Explosives, Pyrotechnics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 40; Journal Issue: 4; Journal ID: ISSN 0721-3115
Publisher:
Wiley
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; small-scale safety testing; proficiency test; friction; round-robin test; safety test protocols; HME; ABL friction; BAM friction

Citation Formats

Warner, Kirstin F., Sandstrom, Mary M., Brown, Geoffrey W., Remmers, Daniel L., Phillips, Jason J., Shelley, Timothy J., Reyes, Jose A., Hsu, Peter C., and Reynolds, John G. ABL and BAM Friction Analysis Comparison. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1002/prep.201400196.
Warner, Kirstin F., Sandstrom, Mary M., Brown, Geoffrey W., Remmers, Daniel L., Phillips, Jason J., Shelley, Timothy J., Reyes, Jose A., Hsu, Peter C., & Reynolds, John G. ABL and BAM Friction Analysis Comparison. United States. doi:10.1002/prep.201400196.
Warner, Kirstin F., Sandstrom, Mary M., Brown, Geoffrey W., Remmers, Daniel L., Phillips, Jason J., Shelley, Timothy J., Reyes, Jose A., Hsu, Peter C., and Reynolds, John G. Mon . "ABL and BAM Friction Analysis Comparison". United States. doi:10.1002/prep.201400196. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1266686.
@article{osti_1266686,
title = {ABL and BAM Friction Analysis Comparison},
author = {Warner, Kirstin F. and Sandstrom, Mary M. and Brown, Geoffrey W. and Remmers, Daniel L. and Phillips, Jason J. and Shelley, Timothy J. and Reyes, Jose A. and Hsu, Peter C. and Reynolds, John G.},
abstractNote = {Here, the Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) program has conducted a proficiency study for Small-Scale Safety and Thermal (SSST) testing of homemade explosives (HMEs). Described here is a comparison of the Alleghany Ballistic Laboratory (ABL) friction data and Bundesanstalt fur Materialforschung und -prufung (BAM) friction data for 19 HEM and military standard explosives.},
doi = {10.1002/prep.201400196},
journal = {Propellants, Explosives, Pyrotechnics},
number = 4,
volume = 40,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Dec 29 00:00:00 EST 2014},
month = {Mon Dec 29 00:00:00 EST 2014}
}

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