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Title: Severe precipitation in northern India in June 2013: Causes, historical context, and changes in probability

Abstract

Cumulative precipitation in northern India in June 2013 was a century-scale event, and evidence for increased probability in the present climate compared to the preindustrial climate is equivocal.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Stanford Univ., CA (United States)
  2. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  3. Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States). Scripps Inst. of Oceanography
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1265733
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society; Journal Volume: 95; Journal Issue: 9
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Singh, Deepti, Horton, Daniel E., Tsiang, Michael, Haugen, Matz, Ashfaq, Moetasim, Mei, Rui, Rastogi, Deeksha, Johnson, Nataniel C., Charland, Allison, Diffenbaugh, Noah, and Rajartnam, Bala. Severe precipitation in northern India in June 2013: Causes, historical context, and changes in probability. United States: N. p., 2014. Web.
Singh, Deepti, Horton, Daniel E., Tsiang, Michael, Haugen, Matz, Ashfaq, Moetasim, Mei, Rui, Rastogi, Deeksha, Johnson, Nataniel C., Charland, Allison, Diffenbaugh, Noah, & Rajartnam, Bala. Severe precipitation in northern India in June 2013: Causes, historical context, and changes in probability. United States.
Singh, Deepti, Horton, Daniel E., Tsiang, Michael, Haugen, Matz, Ashfaq, Moetasim, Mei, Rui, Rastogi, Deeksha, Johnson, Nataniel C., Charland, Allison, Diffenbaugh, Noah, and Rajartnam, Bala. Mon . "Severe precipitation in northern India in June 2013: Causes, historical context, and changes in probability". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1265733,
title = {Severe precipitation in northern India in June 2013: Causes, historical context, and changes in probability},
author = {Singh, Deepti and Horton, Daniel E. and Tsiang, Michael and Haugen, Matz and Ashfaq, Moetasim and Mei, Rui and Rastogi, Deeksha and Johnson, Nataniel C. and Charland, Allison and Diffenbaugh, Noah and Rajartnam, Bala},
abstractNote = {Cumulative precipitation in northern India in June 2013 was a century-scale event, and evidence for increased probability in the present climate compared to the preindustrial climate is equivocal.},
doi = {},
journal = {Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society},
number = 9,
volume = 95,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Mon Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}
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