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Title: LADS: Optimizing Data Transfers using Layout-Aware Data Scheduling

Abstract

While future terabit networks hold the promise of signifi- cantly improving big-data motion among geographically distributed data centers, significant challenges must be overcome even on today s 100 gigabit networks to real- ize end-to-end performance. Multiple bottlenecks exist along the end-to-end path from source to sink. Data stor- age infrastructure at both the source and sink and its in- terplay with the wide-area network are increasingly the bottleneck to achieving high performance. In this paper, we identify the issues that lead to congestion on the path of an end-to-end data transfer in the terabit network en- vironment, and we present a new bulk data movement framework called LADS for terabit networks. LADS ex- ploits the underlying storage layout at each endpoint to maximize throughput without negatively impacting the performance of shared storage resources for other users. LADS also uses the Common Communication Interface (CCI) in lieu of the sockets interface to use zero-copy, OS-bypass hardware when available. It can further im- prove data transfer performance under congestion on the end systems using buffering at the source using flash storage. With our evaluations, we show that LADS can avoid congested storage elements within the shared stor- age resource, improving I/O bandwidth,more » and data transfer rates across the high speed networks.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1265306
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proceedings of the 13th USENIX Conference on File and Storage Technologies (FAST 2015), Santa Clara, CA, USA, 20150216, 20150219
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
File Systems; Networking; Data Management

Citation Formats

Kim, Youngjae, Atchley, Scott, Vallee, Geoffroy R, and Shipman, Galen M. LADS: Optimizing Data Transfers using Layout-Aware Data Scheduling. United States: N. p., 2015. Web.
Kim, Youngjae, Atchley, Scott, Vallee, Geoffroy R, & Shipman, Galen M. LADS: Optimizing Data Transfers using Layout-Aware Data Scheduling. United States.
Kim, Youngjae, Atchley, Scott, Vallee, Geoffroy R, and Shipman, Galen M. Thu . "LADS: Optimizing Data Transfers using Layout-Aware Data Scheduling". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1265306.
@article{osti_1265306,
title = {LADS: Optimizing Data Transfers using Layout-Aware Data Scheduling},
author = {Kim, Youngjae and Atchley, Scott and Vallee, Geoffroy R and Shipman, Galen M},
abstractNote = {While future terabit networks hold the promise of signifi- cantly improving big-data motion among geographically distributed data centers, significant challenges must be overcome even on today s 100 gigabit networks to real- ize end-to-end performance. Multiple bottlenecks exist along the end-to-end path from source to sink. Data stor- age infrastructure at both the source and sink and its in- terplay with the wide-area network are increasingly the bottleneck to achieving high performance. In this paper, we identify the issues that lead to congestion on the path of an end-to-end data transfer in the terabit network en- vironment, and we present a new bulk data movement framework called LADS for terabit networks. LADS ex- ploits the underlying storage layout at each endpoint to maximize throughput without negatively impacting the performance of shared storage resources for other users. LADS also uses the Common Communication Interface (CCI) in lieu of the sockets interface to use zero-copy, OS-bypass hardware when available. It can further im- prove data transfer performance under congestion on the end systems using buffering at the source using flash storage. With our evaluations, we show that LADS can avoid congested storage elements within the shared stor- age resource, improving I/O bandwidth, and data transfer rates across the high speed networks.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2015},
month = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2015}
}

Conference:
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  • Bulk data transfer is facing significant challenges in the coming era of big data. There are multiple performance bottlenecks along the end-to-end path from the source to destination storage system. The limitations of current generation data transfer tools themselves can have a significant impact on end-to-end data transfer rates. In this paper, we identify the issues that lead to underperformance of these tools, and present a new data transfer tool with an innovative I/O scheduler called MDTM. The MDTM scheduler exploits underlying multicore layouts to optimize throughput by reducing delay and contention for I/O reading and writing operations. With ourmore » evaluations, we show how MDTM successfully avoids NUMA-based congestion and significantly improves end-to-end data transfer rates across high-speed wide area networks.« less
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