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Title: Computer systems for annotation of single molecule fragments

Abstract

There are provided computer systems for visualizing and annotating single molecule images. Annotation systems in accordance with this disclosure allow a user to mark and annotate single molecules of interest and their restriction enzyme cut sites thereby determining the restriction fragments of single nucleic acid molecules. The markings and annotations may be automatically generated by the system in certain embodiments and they may be overlaid translucently onto the single molecule images. An image caching system may be implemented in the computer annotation systems to reduce image processing time. The annotation systems include one or more connectors connecting to one or more databases capable of storing single molecule data as well as other biomedical data. Such diverse array of data can be retrieved and used to validate the markings and annotations. The annotation systems may be implemented and deployed over a computer network. They may be ergonomically optimized to facilitate user interactions.

Inventors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation, Madison, WI (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1264387
Patent Number(s):
9,396,304
Application Number:
10/888,517
Assignee:
Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (Madison, WI) CHO
DOE Contract Number:
FG02-99ER62830
Resource Type:
Patent
Resource Relation:
Patent File Date: 2014 Jul 12
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Schwartz, David Charles, and Severin, Jessica. Computer systems for annotation of single molecule fragments. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Schwartz, David Charles, & Severin, Jessica. Computer systems for annotation of single molecule fragments. United States.
Schwartz, David Charles, and Severin, Jessica. 2016. "Computer systems for annotation of single molecule fragments". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1264387.
@article{osti_1264387,
title = {Computer systems for annotation of single molecule fragments},
author = {Schwartz, David Charles and Severin, Jessica},
abstractNote = {There are provided computer systems for visualizing and annotating single molecule images. Annotation systems in accordance with this disclosure allow a user to mark and annotate single molecules of interest and their restriction enzyme cut sites thereby determining the restriction fragments of single nucleic acid molecules. The markings and annotations may be automatically generated by the system in certain embodiments and they may be overlaid translucently onto the single molecule images. An image caching system may be implemented in the computer annotation systems to reduce image processing time. The annotation systems include one or more connectors connecting to one or more databases capable of storing single molecule data as well as other biomedical data. Such diverse array of data can be retrieved and used to validate the markings and annotations. The annotation systems may be implemented and deployed over a computer network. They may be ergonomically optimized to facilitate user interactions.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}

Patent:

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