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Title: Corrosion-Resistant Crystalline-Oxide Coatings on Steel Substrates by an Immersion Anodizing Process

Authors:
 [1]
  1. NanoCoatings, Inc., Rapid City , SD (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
NanoCoatings, Inc., Rapid City , SD (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Bioenergy Technologies Office (EE-3B)
OSTI Identifier:
1263554
Report Number(s):
Final Report
DOE Contract Number:
SC0013768
Type / Phase:
STTR
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; Plasma-Electrolytic-Oxidation; Steels; Alumina; Mullite; Cold-Spray; Aluminized-Steel; Corrosion-Resistance; Cookstoves; Stove-Testing

Citation Formats

Kustas, Frank. Corrosion-Resistant Crystalline-Oxide Coatings on Steel Substrates by an Immersion Anodizing Process. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Kustas, Frank. Corrosion-Resistant Crystalline-Oxide Coatings on Steel Substrates by an Immersion Anodizing Process. United States.
Kustas, Frank. 2016. "Corrosion-Resistant Crystalline-Oxide Coatings on Steel Substrates by an Immersion Anodizing Process". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1263554,
title = {Corrosion-Resistant Crystalline-Oxide Coatings on Steel Substrates by an Immersion Anodizing Process},
author = {Kustas, Frank},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}

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  • Steam heat is still used at many U.S. Army installations. Condensate return lines, which convey the liquid condensate that occurs throughout the system back to the boiler, form an integral part of steam distribution systems. Steam condensate return lines degrade through several site-specific mechanisms that result in corrosion and cause these systems to fail before reaching their expected design life. This report presents the results of field tests done at an Army installation using corrosion-resistant phenolic coatings to mitigate these degradation processes. The coatings were found to be effective in mitigating condensate corrosion; preliminary results indicate that this coating maymore » extend the expected service life of condensate return lines by at least 10 percent. Phenolic coating, Condensate return Lines, Corrosion resistant coatings, Corrosion mitigation, Steam distribution system.« less
  • Declassified 26 Nov 1973. Coatings have been studied as a means of reducing the water vapor corrosion of BeO fuel elements for an air-breathing ramjet reactor (Pluto). A 15 wt% Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/-stabilized ZrO/sub 2/ coating was mos t successful. Results of tests on coated samples indicated that the corrosion rates were dependent on temperature, humidity, and air velocity. Several possible mechanisms are discussed. A gap develops between the coating and the BeO substrate, limiting the corrosion that can be tolerated. An analytical model was satisfactory in correlating and extrapolating corrosion losses. The results indicate that coated fuel elements canmore » be operated successfully at temperatures up to 1650 deg C in moist air for flying reactor conditions. (auth)« less
  • Declassified 26 Nov 1973. Coatings were studied as a means of reducing the water vapor corrosion of BeO fuel elements for an air-breathing ramjet reactor (Pluto). The fuel elements are BeO containing fuel as a secondphase solid solution of 1.06 UO/sub 2/: 1.00 Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/: 1.00 ZrO/sub 2/ ( mole ratios). Various potential coating materials were prepared and evaluated and different coating application techniques were used. The most consistent and successful coating was ZrO/sub 2/ stabilized with 15 wt% Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/, although this coating crazed because its thermal expansion exceeds that of BeO. Corrosion rates were shown tomore » increase with increasing humidity and velocity, and so testing at-high velocity was necessary. An analytical model of the coated tube helped to correlate corrosion tests at various conditions. Several mechanisms of loss from coated tubes were considered. Corrosion rates of coated tubes at 165O deg C were measured in air containing 10 to 12 wt% water at reactor- like velocities (100,000 Reynolds number). Extrapolation of this and other data to a realistic reactor ambient humidity of 1 wt% gave losses near 0.1 mg/cm/sup 2/ -hour, or 0.00017 inch in 10 hours, which are considered satisfactorily low. The coating also reduced UO/sub 2/ loss to undetectable levels. The corrosion rates of uncoated BeO were also measured, and were slightly higher than but consistent with calculated predictions. (auth)« less
  • This bibliography contains citations concerning anticorrosive protective coatings. Patents include surface treatments, paints, antistatic coatings, silicate coatings, fatty acids, organic and inorganic materials, and techniques for applying various coatings. Citations concerning epoxy coatings, acrylic and acrylate coatings, urethane coatings, and water-borne coatings are excluded and examined in separate bibliographies. (This updated bibliography contains 306 citations, 230 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)