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Title: Implications of the 750 GeV γγ Resonance as a Case Study for the International Linear Collider

Abstract

If the γγ resonance at 750 GeV suggested by 2015 LHC data turns out to be a real effect, what are the implications for the physics case and upgrade path of the International Linear Collider? Whether or not the resonance is confirmed, this question provides an interesting case study testing the robustness of the ILC physics case. In this note, we address this question with two points: (1) Almost all models proposed for the new 750 GeV particle require additional new particles with electroweak couplings. The key elements of the 500 GeV ILC physics program - precision measurements of the Higgs boson, the top quark, and 4-fermion interactions - will powerfully discriminate among these models. This information will be important in conjunction with new LHC data, or alone, if the new particles accompanying the 750 GeV resonance are beyond the mass reach of the LHC. (2) Over a longer term, the energy upgrade of the ILC to 1 TeV already discussed in the ILC TDR will enable experiments in γγ and e +e - collisions to directly produce and study the 750 GeV particle from these unique initial states.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7];  [8];  [9];  [10];  [7];  [11];  [12];  [13];  [14];  [15];  [16];  [17];  [10] more »;  [12];  [18];  [19];  [20];  [21] « less
  1. High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan)
  2. Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain). Inst. Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA) and Inst. de Fisica d'Altes Energies (IFAE)
  3. SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
  4. Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). Center for High Energy Physics
  5. Univ. of Toyama (Japan). Dept. of Physics
  6. Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy
  7. Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)
  8. High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Kavli Inst. for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe
  9. Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Lab. for Elementary Particle Physics
  10. Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay (France). Linear Accelerator Lab. (LAL). Centre Scientifique d'Orsay
  11. Max Planck Inst. for Physics (MPP), Munich (Germany)
  12. Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). International Center for Elementary Particle Physics (ICEPP)
  13. Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States). Dept. of Physics
  14. Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics
  15. Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay (France). Lab. of Theoretical Physics (LPT)
  16. Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Kavli Inst. for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe
  17. Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Physics
  18. Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), Valencia (Spain) and Univ. of Valencia (Spain). Inst. for Corpuscular Physics (IFIC)
  19. Korean Inst. for Advanced Study (KIAS), Seoul (Korea, Republic of ). Quantum Universe Center
  20. Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Kavli Inst. for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
  21. Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Physics
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), High Energy Physics (HEP) (SC-25); USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1263398
Report Number(s):
SLAC-PUB-16751
arXiv:1607.03829; TRN: US1601610
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; INTERNATIONAL LINEAR COLLIDER; GEV RANGE 100-1000; RESONANCE PARTICLES; ELECTRON-POSITRON INTERACTIONS; POSTULATED PARTICLES; PHOTON-PHOTON INTERACTIONS; Phenomenology-HEP; HEPPH

Citation Formats

Fujii, Keisuke, Grojean, Christophe, Peskin, Michael E., Barklow, Tim, Gao, Yuanning, Kanemura, Shinya, Kim, Hyungdo, List, Jenny, Nojiri, Mihoko, Perelstein, Maxim, Poschl, Roman, Reuter, Jurgen, Simon, Frank, Tanabe, Tomohiko, Yu, Jaehoon, Wells, James D., Falkowski, Adam, Matsumoto, Shigeki, Moroi, Takeo, Richard, Francois, Tian, Junping, Vos, Marcel, Yokoya, Hiroshi, Murayama, Hitoshi, and Yamamoto, Hitoshi. Implications of the 750 GeV γγ Resonance as a Case Study for the International Linear Collider. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1263398.
Fujii, Keisuke, Grojean, Christophe, Peskin, Michael E., Barklow, Tim, Gao, Yuanning, Kanemura, Shinya, Kim, Hyungdo, List, Jenny, Nojiri, Mihoko, Perelstein, Maxim, Poschl, Roman, Reuter, Jurgen, Simon, Frank, Tanabe, Tomohiko, Yu, Jaehoon, Wells, James D., Falkowski, Adam, Matsumoto, Shigeki, Moroi, Takeo, Richard, Francois, Tian, Junping, Vos, Marcel, Yokoya, Hiroshi, Murayama, Hitoshi, & Yamamoto, Hitoshi. Implications of the 750 GeV γγ Resonance as a Case Study for the International Linear Collider. United States. doi:10.2172/1263398.
Fujii, Keisuke, Grojean, Christophe, Peskin, Michael E., Barklow, Tim, Gao, Yuanning, Kanemura, Shinya, Kim, Hyungdo, List, Jenny, Nojiri, Mihoko, Perelstein, Maxim, Poschl, Roman, Reuter, Jurgen, Simon, Frank, Tanabe, Tomohiko, Yu, Jaehoon, Wells, James D., Falkowski, Adam, Matsumoto, Shigeki, Moroi, Takeo, Richard, Francois, Tian, Junping, Vos, Marcel, Yokoya, Hiroshi, Murayama, Hitoshi, and Yamamoto, Hitoshi. 2016. "Implications of the 750 GeV γγ Resonance as a Case Study for the International Linear Collider". United States. doi:10.2172/1263398. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1263398.
@article{osti_1263398,
title = {Implications of the 750 GeV γγ Resonance as a Case Study for the International Linear Collider},
author = {Fujii, Keisuke and Grojean, Christophe and Peskin, Michael E. and Barklow, Tim and Gao, Yuanning and Kanemura, Shinya and Kim, Hyungdo and List, Jenny and Nojiri, Mihoko and Perelstein, Maxim and Poschl, Roman and Reuter, Jurgen and Simon, Frank and Tanabe, Tomohiko and Yu, Jaehoon and Wells, James D. and Falkowski, Adam and Matsumoto, Shigeki and Moroi, Takeo and Richard, Francois and Tian, Junping and Vos, Marcel and Yokoya, Hiroshi and Murayama, Hitoshi and Yamamoto, Hitoshi},
abstractNote = {If the γγ resonance at 750 GeV suggested by 2015 LHC data turns out to be a real effect, what are the implications for the physics case and upgrade path of the International Linear Collider? Whether or not the resonance is confirmed, this question provides an interesting case study testing the robustness of the ILC physics case. In this note, we address this question with two points: (1) Almost all models proposed for the new 750 GeV particle require additional new particles with electroweak couplings. The key elements of the 500 GeV ILC physics program - precision measurements of the Higgs boson, the top quark, and 4-fermion interactions - will powerfully discriminate among these models. This information will be important in conjunction with new LHC data, or alone, if the new particles accompanying the 750 GeV resonance are beyond the mass reach of the LHC. (2) Over a longer term, the energy upgrade of the ILC to 1 TeV already discussed in the ILC TDR will enable experiments in γγ and e+e- collisions to directly produce and study the 750 GeV particle from these unique initial states.},
doi = {10.2172/1263398},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}

Technical Report:

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  • We summarize the physics case for the International Linear Collider (ILC). We review the key motivations for the ILC presented in the literature, updating the projected measurement uncertainties for the ILC experiments in accord with the expected schedule of operation of the accelerator and the results of the most recent simulation studies.
  • This 1995 report of the International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee is the first attempt to gather in one document the current status of all major e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider projects in the world. The report is the result of a collaborative effort of scientists from many laboratories working together over a period of about one year. A short description of the organization, origins and history of the report is given below. To get an idea of the organization, the reader should first refer to the Table of Contents. Chapter 1 is an introduction and general overview of themore » respective 500 GeV c.m. energy machines. In contrast, Chapter 2, cutting across individual machine boundaries, gives a comparative description and discussion of all the major machine sub-systems as well as particle physics experimentation, showing where these subjects stand today and what additional work needs to be done in the next few years to reach the point where complete design reports can be prepared. Chapter 3 describes the various paths to energy upgrades, and other experimental options ({gamma}{gamma}, e{sup {minus}}e{sup {minus}}, etc.). Chapter 4 gives a short status report of the machine experiments and test facilities being built in the world. Chapter 5 outlines current and other possible areas of collaboration and finally., Chapter 6 summarizes our principal conclusions.« less
  • As this report is being published, the international high energy physics (HEP) community finds itself confronting a set of fascinating discoveries and new questions regarding the nature of matter and its fundamental particles and forces. The observation of neutrino oscillations that indicates that neutrinos have mass, measurements of the accelerating expansion of the universe that may be due to dark energy, and evidence for a period of rapid inflation at the beginning of the Big Bang are stimulating the entire field. Looming on the horizon are the potential discoveries of a Higgs particle that may reveal the origin of massmore » and of a whole family of supersymmetric particles that may be part of the cosmic dark matter. For the HEP community to elucidate these mysteries, new accelerators are indispensable. At this time, after careful deliberations, all three regional organizations of the HEP community (ACFA in Asia, HEPAP in North America, and ECFA in Europe) have reached the common conclusion that the next accelerator should be an electron-positron linear collider with an initial center-of-mass energy of 500 Giga-electronvolts (GeV), later upgradable to higher energies, and that it should be built and operated in parallel with the Large Hadron Collider under construction at CERN. Hence, this second report of the International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee (ILC-TRC) comes at a very timely moment. The report was requested by the International Committee on Future Accelerators (ICFA) in February 2001 to assess the current technical status of electron-positron linear collider designs in the various regions. Note that the ILC-TRC was not asked to concern itself with either cost studies or the ultimate selection process of a machine. This Executive Summary gives a short outline of the genesis of the report, the charge given to the committee, and its organization. It then presents a brief description of four electron-positron linear collider designs at hand. The methodology used to assess these designs is described in some detail. The assessments are followed by a list of R&D tasks recommended by the committee for the next few years. The tasks are ranked according to certain specific criteria. The summary concludes with a few remarks outlining upcoming developments that may guide ICFA and the HEP community in their future plans to promote and execute an international project. The Executive Summary stands alone in the sense that it allows a busy reader, who may not have the time to read the entire report, to become familiar with its essential contents.« less
  • The International Linear Collider Technical Review Committee (ILC-TRC), formed in 1994, was reconvened in February 2001 by the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA) to assess the current technical status of all electron-positron linear collider designs at hand in the world: TESLA, JLC-C, JLC-X/NLC and CLIC. The ILC-TRC worked for exactly two years and submitted its report to ICFA in February 2003. This paper presents the motivation behind the study, the charge to the committee and its organization, a table of machine parameters for 500 GeV c.m. energy and later upgrades to higher energies, the methodology used to assess themore » designs, and a ranked list of R&D tasks still deemed necessary between now and the time any one of the projects is selected by the HEP community and begins construction. Possible future developments are briefly discussed.« less
  • The International Technology Recommendation Panel distributed a list of questions to each major laboratory. Question 30, part b and d, were technology independent and related to the physics goals of the Linear Collider. An international panel, with representation from Asia, Europe, and the Americas, was formed by the World Wide Study during LCWS04 to formulate a response. This is given below and constitutes the response of the world-wide Linear Collider community.