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Title: Prospect for Developing a Consolidated Bioprocessing (CBP) Strain Using Xylan as the Substrate: the Case Study of Yarrowia lipolytica

Abstract

To achieve the goal of developing a direct microbial sugar conversion platform for the production of lipids and drop-in fuels from cellulosic biomass substrate, Yarrowia lipolytica was used to investigate its potential for being developed as CBP strain by expressing cellulase and xylanase enzymes. Y. lipolytica is known to accumulate lipids intracellularly and is capable of metabolizing glucose and xylose to produce lipids; however, due to the lack of the biomass degrading enzymes, it cannot directly utilize lignocellulosic substrates as carbon sources. While research is continuing on the development of a Y. lipolytica strain able to degrade cellulose, in this study, we present successful expression of several xylanases in Y. lipolytica. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study introducing heterologous hemicellulose genes into the genome of Y. lipolytica. SDS-PAGE and western blotting analysis showed that the endo-xylanase gene XynII and exo-xylosidase gene XlnD were successfully expressed and secreted, and the expressed xylanases were likely either not or sparsely glycosylated, which is advantageous for expression of heterologous proteins from any species. Enzymatic activity tests further demonstrated active expression of XynII and XlnD in Y. lipolytica. Furthermore, synergistic action on converting xylan to xylose was observed when XlnDmore » worked in concert with XynII. XlnD was able to work on the xylo-oligomers generated by XynII, enhancing the xylan conversion to monomeric xylose. The successful expression of these xylanases in Yarrowia further advances us towards our goal to develop a direct microbial conversion process using this organism. and xylose to produce lipids; however, due to the lack of the biomass degrading enzymes, it cannot directly utilize lignocellulosic substrates as carbon sources. While research is continuing on the development of a Y. lipolytica strain able to degrade cellulose, in this study, we present successful expression of several xylanases in Y. lipolytica.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Bioenergy Technologies Office (EE-3B)
OSTI Identifier:
1262665
Report Number(s):
NREL/PO-2700-63286
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at the 37th Symposium on Biotechnology for Fuels and Chemicals (SBFC), 27-30 April 2015, San Diego, California
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; xylanase; xylosidase; heterologous expression; Yarrowia lipolytica; xylan; xylose

Citation Formats

Wang, Wei, Wei, Hui, Alahuhta, Markus, Zhang, Min, and Himmel, Michael E. Prospect for Developing a Consolidated Bioprocessing (CBP) Strain Using Xylan as the Substrate: the Case Study of Yarrowia lipolytica. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Wang, Wei, Wei, Hui, Alahuhta, Markus, Zhang, Min, & Himmel, Michael E. Prospect for Developing a Consolidated Bioprocessing (CBP) Strain Using Xylan as the Substrate: the Case Study of Yarrowia lipolytica. United States.
Wang, Wei, Wei, Hui, Alahuhta, Markus, Zhang, Min, and Himmel, Michael E. 2016. "Prospect for Developing a Consolidated Bioprocessing (CBP) Strain Using Xylan as the Substrate: the Case Study of Yarrowia lipolytica". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1262665.
@article{osti_1262665,
title = {Prospect for Developing a Consolidated Bioprocessing (CBP) Strain Using Xylan as the Substrate: the Case Study of Yarrowia lipolytica},
author = {Wang, Wei and Wei, Hui and Alahuhta, Markus and Zhang, Min and Himmel, Michael E.},
abstractNote = {To achieve the goal of developing a direct microbial sugar conversion platform for the production of lipids and drop-in fuels from cellulosic biomass substrate, Yarrowia lipolytica was used to investigate its potential for being developed as CBP strain by expressing cellulase and xylanase enzymes. Y. lipolytica is known to accumulate lipids intracellularly and is capable of metabolizing glucose and xylose to produce lipids; however, due to the lack of the biomass degrading enzymes, it cannot directly utilize lignocellulosic substrates as carbon sources. While research is continuing on the development of a Y. lipolytica strain able to degrade cellulose, in this study, we present successful expression of several xylanases in Y. lipolytica. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study introducing heterologous hemicellulose genes into the genome of Y. lipolytica. SDS-PAGE and western blotting analysis showed that the endo-xylanase gene XynII and exo-xylosidase gene XlnD were successfully expressed and secreted, and the expressed xylanases were likely either not or sparsely glycosylated, which is advantageous for expression of heterologous proteins from any species. Enzymatic activity tests further demonstrated active expression of XynII and XlnD in Y. lipolytica. Furthermore, synergistic action on converting xylan to xylose was observed when XlnD worked in concert with XynII. XlnD was able to work on the xylo-oligomers generated by XynII, enhancing the xylan conversion to monomeric xylose. The successful expression of these xylanases in Yarrowia further advances us towards our goal to develop a direct microbial conversion process using this organism. and xylose to produce lipids; however, due to the lack of the biomass degrading enzymes, it cannot directly utilize lignocellulosic substrates as carbon sources. While research is continuing on the development of a Y. lipolytica strain able to degrade cellulose, in this study, we present successful expression of several xylanases in Y. lipolytica.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}

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  • Background: Yarrowia lipolytica is an oleaginous yeast capable of metabolizing glucose to lipids, which then accumulate intracellularly. However, it lacks the suite of cellulolytic enzymes required to break down biomass cellulose and cannot therefore utilize biomass directly as a carbon source. Toward the development of a direct microbial conversion platform for the production of hydrocarbon fuels from cellulosic biomass, the potential for Y. lipolytica to function as a consolidated bioprocessing strain was investigated by first conducting a genomic search and functional testing of its endogenous glycoside hydrolases. Once the range of endogenous enzymes was determined, the critical cellulases from Trichodermamore » reesei were cloned into Yarrowia. Results: Initially, work to express T. reesei endoglucanase II (EGII) and cellobiohydrolase (CBH) II in Y. lipolytica resulted in the successful secretion of active enzymes. However, a critical cellulase, T. reesei CBHI, while successfully expressed in and secreted from Yarrowia, showed less than expected enzymatic activity, suggesting an incompatibility (probably at the post-translational level) for its expression in Yarrowia. This result prompted us to evaluate alternative or modified CBHI enzymes. Our subsequent expression of a T. reesei-Talaromyces emersonii (Tr-Te) chimeric CBHI, Chaetomium thermophilum CBHI, and Humicola grisea CBHI demonstrated remarkably improved enzymatic activities. Specifically, the purified chimeric Tr-Te CBHI showed a specific activity on Avicel that is comparable to that of the native T. reesei CBHI. Furthermore, the chimeric Tr-Te CBHI also showed significant synergism with EGII and CBHII in degrading cellulosic substrates, using either mixed supernatants or co-cultures of the corresponding Y. lipolytica transformants. The consortia system approach also allows rational volume mixing of the transformant cultures in accordance with the optimal ratio of cellulases required for efficient degradation of cellulosic substrates. In Conclusion: Taken together, this work demonstrates the first case of successful expression of a chimeric CBHI with essentially full native activity in Y. lipolytica, and supports the notion that Y. lipolytica strains can be genetically engineered, ultimately by heterologous expression of fungal cellulases and other enzymes, to directly convert lignocellulosic substrates to biofuels.« less
  • Background: Higher ratios of syringyl-to-guaiacyl (S/G) lignin components of Populus were shown to improve sugar release by enzymatic hydrolysis using commercial blends. Cellulolytic microbes are often robust biomass hydrolyzers and may offer cost advantages; however, it is unknown whether their activity can also be significantly influenced by the ratio of different monolignol types in Populus biomass. Hydrolysis and fermentation of autoclaved, but otherwise not pretreated Populus trichocarpa by Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405 was compared using feedstocks that had similar carbohydrate and total lignin contents but differed in S/G ratios. Results: Populus with an S/G ratio of 2.1 was converted moremore » rapidly and to a greater extent compared to similar biomass that had a ratio of 1.2. For either microbes or commercial enzymes, an approximate 50% relative difference in total solids solubilization was measured for both biomasses, which suggests that the differences and limitations in the microbial breakdown of lignocellulose may be largely from the enzymatic hydrolytic process. Unexpectedly, the reduction in glucan content per gram solid in the residual microbially processed biomass was similar (17–18%) irrespective of S/G ratio, pointing to a similar mechanism of solubilization that proceeded at different rates. Fermentation metabolome testing did not reveal the release of known biomass-derived alcohol and aldehyde inhibitors that could explain observed differences in microbial hydrolytic activity. Biomass-derived p-hydroxybenzoic acid was up to ninefold higher in low S/G ratio biomass fermentations, but was not found to be inhibitory in subsequent test fermentations. Cellulose crystallinity and degree of polymerization did not vary between Populus lines and had minor changes after fermentation. However, lignin molecular weights and cellulose accessibility determined by Simons’ staining were positively correlated to the S/G content. Conclusions: Higher S/G ratios in Populus biomass lead to longer and more linear lignin chains and greater access to surface cellulosic content by microbe-bound enzymatic complexes. Substrate access limitation is suggested as a primary bottleneck in solubilization of minimally processed Populus, which has important implications for microbial deconstruction of lignocellulose biomass. Our findings will allow others to examine different Populus lines and to test if similar observations are possible for other plant species.« less
  • Background: Higher ratios of syringyl-to-guaiacyl (S/G) lignin components of Populus were shown to improve sugar release by enzymatic hydrolysis using commercial blends. Cellulolytic microbes are often robust biomass hydrolyzers and may offer cost advantages, however, it is unknown whether their activity can also be significantly influenced by the ratio of different monolignol types in Populus biomass. Hydrolysis and fermentation of autoclaved but otherwise not pretreated Populus trichocarpa by Clostridium thermocellum ATCC 27405 was compared using feedstocks that had similar carbohydrate and total lignin contents but differed in S/G ratios. Results: Populus with an S/G ratio of 2.1 was converted moremore » rapidly and to a greater extent compared to similar biomass that had a ratio of 1.2. For either microbes or commercial enzymes, an approximate 50% relative difference in total solids solubilization was measured for both biomasses, which suggests that the differences and limitations in the microbial breakdown of lignocellulose may be largely from the enzymatic hydrolytic process. Unexpectedly, the reduction in glucan content per gram solid in the residual microbially processed biomass was similar (17 18 %) irrespective of S/G ratio, pointing to a similar mechanism of solubilization that proceeded at different rates. Fermentation metabolome testing did not reveal the release of known biomass-derived alcohol and aldehyde inhibitors that could explain observed differences in microbial hydrolytic activity. Biomass-derived p-hydroxybenzoic acid was up to nine-fold higher in low S/G ratio biomass fermentations, but was not found to be inhibitory in subsequent test fermentations. Cellulose crystallinity and degree of polymerization did not vary between Populus lines and had minor changes after fermentation. However, lignin molecular weights and cellulose accessibility determined by Simons staining were positively correlated to the S/G content. Conclusions: Higher S/G ratios in Populus biomass lead to longer and more linear lignin chains and greater access to surface cellulosic content by microbe-bound enzymatic complexes. Substrate access limitation is suggested as a primary bottleneck in solubilization of minimally processed Populus, which has important implications for microbial deconstruction of lignocellulose biomass. Our findings will allow others to examine different Populus lines and to test if similar observations are possible for other plant species.« less
  • High-resolution seismic reflection profiling can be used to evaluate detailed structural and stratigraphic features of coal prospects. Since most coal prospects are relatively shallow (less than six hundred meters deep), the vertical and lateral resolution of seismic data can be significantly improved by high sampling rates in space and time. The case study presented shows the effective use of seismic data in evaluation of the Wyodak coal seam at a prospective coal gasification site. The data were used to map the detailed structure and thickness of the coal and to search for lateral discontinuities, such as pinchouts and faults. Anmore » important find was a paleochannel cutting across the base of the coal seam, which was later confirmed by drilling.« less