skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Studies of Hadronic Physics with the BaBar Detector at SLAC and the Atlas Detector at the LHC

Abstract

The University of Louisville High Energy Physics group contributed significantly to the success of the BaBar Experiment at SLAC and the Mu2e Experiment at Fermilab. In particular, they have contributed to understanding hadronic processes in electron-positron annihilation and charged lepton flavor violation in a very rare muon conversion process. Both are high-precision undertakings at the Intensity Frontier of High Energy Physics.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Univ. of Louisville, KY (United States). Dept. of Physics
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Louisville, KY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), High Energy Physics (HEP) (SC-25)
OSTI Identifier:
1262373
Report Number(s):
DOE-UofL-09812
DOE Contract Number:
SC0009812
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; BaBar; Hadronic physics; Mu2e; Charged Lepton Flavor Violation

Citation Formats

Brown, David Norvil. Studies of Hadronic Physics with the BaBar Detector at SLAC and the Atlas Detector at the LHC. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1262373.
Brown, David Norvil. Studies of Hadronic Physics with the BaBar Detector at SLAC and the Atlas Detector at the LHC. United States. doi:10.2172/1262373.
Brown, David Norvil. 2016. "Studies of Hadronic Physics with the BaBar Detector at SLAC and the Atlas Detector at the LHC". United States. doi:10.2172/1262373. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1262373.
@article{osti_1262373,
title = {Studies of Hadronic Physics with the BaBar Detector at SLAC and the Atlas Detector at the LHC},
author = {Brown, David Norvil},
abstractNote = {The University of Louisville High Energy Physics group contributed significantly to the success of the BaBar Experiment at SLAC and the Mu2e Experiment at Fermilab. In particular, they have contributed to understanding hadronic processes in electron-positron annihilation and charged lepton flavor violation in a very rare muon conversion process. Both are high-precision undertakings at the Intensity Frontier of High Energy Physics.},
doi = {10.2172/1262373},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share:
  • A study of the decay {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}} (K{sub S}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) using the BABAR detector is presented. Using 124.4 fb{sup -1} of data we measure {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {bar K}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (0.830 {+-} 0.005(stat) {+-} 0.042(syst))%, which is the world's most precise measurement to date of this branching ratio, and is consistent with the current world average. This preliminary result, unlike most of the {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {bar K}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) measurements already published, is systematics dominated and so the biggest future improvement to this numbermore » should come from reducing the systematic uncertainties in the analysis. A study of the K{pi} mass spectrum, from which the strange (K{pi}) spectral function can be measured, reveals excess contributions above the K*(892) tail at higher K{pi} mass. While in the past this has been thought to be due to K*(892) - K*(1410) interference, we find that the K*(1410), whose branching ratio to K{pi} is approximately 7%, seems insufficient to explain the excess mass observed in the data. Instead, we perform a fit using a K*(892) - K*(1680) interference model and find better agreement. The discrepancy that remains could be due to an s-wave contribution to the interference that is not parameterized in the model used, and/or detector smearing that is not accounted for in our fit. We also attempt to find an s-wave contribution to the K{pi} mass spectrum by searching for an sp-interference effect. While we find a hint that such an effect exists, we have neither the confidence in the statistics nor systematics in the higher K{pi} mass region to announce an observation. We conclude that it would be a worthwhile study to pursue.« less
  • The University of Louisville High Energy Physics group has undertaken a long-term effort in understanding baryon production in elementary particle processes in the 10 GeV energy region. We have contributed significantly to the broad program of the BaBar Collaboration, particularly in support of computing, data visualization, and simulation. We report here on progress in the areas of service to the Collaboration and understanding of baryon production via measurement of inclusive hadronic particle spectra.
  • The Prairie View A&M University High Energy Physics Group with its contingent of three undergraduates physics majors, joined the BaBar Collaboration at SLAC in September 1994. BaBar is the experiment and detector running in the PEP-II ring at SLAC as part of the Asymmetric B Factory project there to study CP violation and heavy flavor physics. The focus of our effort before this year was with the Muon/Neutral Hadron Detector/Instrumented Flux Return (IFD) subgroup within the BaBar collaboration, and particularly with the GEANT simulation of the IFR. With the GEANT3 simulation essentially frozen, and the GEANT4 full simulation of themore » IFR done, we have decided to redirect our efforts toward other areas.« less
  • A new gas distribution and monitoring system was installed as part of an upgrade of the forward endcap muon detection system (IFR) of the BaBar detector at SLAC. Over 300 gas circuits are controlled and monitored. The return gas flow is monitored by digital bubblers which use photo-gate electronics to count the bubbling rate. The rates are monitored in real time and recorded in a history database allowing studies of flow rate versus chamber performance.
  • I report on recent studies of hadronic physics performed by the BaBar Collaboration. Emphasis is given to the measurement of the properties of newly discovered charmed hadrons and to the searches for light and heavy pentaquarks. I report on recent studies of hadronic physics performed by the BaBar Collaboration. Emphasis is given to the measurement of the properties of newly discovered charmed hadrons and to the searches for light and heavy pentaquarks.