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Title: Science in 60 – Simulating Flames Helps Tame Future Wildfires

Abstract

FIRETEC presents a new way of studying fire and learning how to better manage and cope with it. The model provides additional scientific input for decisions by policymakers working in land management, water resources and energy. The team hopes it will eventually assist fire and fuel management operations. This research is done in partnership with the USDA Forest Service, Air Force Wildland Fire Center, INRA and Canadian Forest Service.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
LANL (Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1262313
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; WILDFIRES; FIRETEC; ATMOSPHERE; FIRES

Citation Formats

Lin, Rod. Science in 60 – Simulating Flames Helps Tame Future Wildfires. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Lin, Rod. Science in 60 – Simulating Flames Helps Tame Future Wildfires. United States.
Lin, Rod. 2016. "Science in 60 – Simulating Flames Helps Tame Future Wildfires". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1262313.
@article{osti_1262313,
title = {Science in 60 – Simulating Flames Helps Tame Future Wildfires},
author = {Lin, Rod},
abstractNote = {FIRETEC presents a new way of studying fire and learning how to better manage and cope with it. The model provides additional scientific input for decisions by policymakers working in land management, water resources and energy. The team hopes it will eventually assist fire and fuel management operations. This research is done in partnership with the USDA Forest Service, Air Force Wildland Fire Center, INRA and Canadian Forest Service.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}
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