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Title: Distributed Wind Soft Costs: A Beginning

Abstract

Tony Jimenez presented this overview of distributed wind soft costs at the 2016 Small Wind Conference in Stevens Point, Wisconsin, on June 14, 2016. Soft costs are any non-hardware project costs, such as costs related to permitting fees, installer/developer profit, taxes, transaction costs, permitting, installation, indirect corporate costs, installation labor, and supply chain costs. This presentation provides an overview of soft costs, a distributed wind project taxonomy (of which soft costs are a subset), an alpha data set project demographics, data summary, and future work in this area.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Wind and Water Technologies Office (EE-4W)
OSTI Identifier:
1261991
Report Number(s):
NREL/PR-5000-66654
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at the Small Wind Conference 2016, 13-15 June 2016, Stevens Point, Wisconsin
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; 24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; distributed wind; wind energy; wind energy soft costs; distributed wind project costs

Citation Formats

Jimenez, Tony, Forsyth,Trudy, Preus, Robert, Christol, Corrie, Orrell, Alice, and Tegen, Suzanne. Distributed Wind Soft Costs: A Beginning. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Jimenez, Tony, Forsyth,Trudy, Preus, Robert, Christol, Corrie, Orrell, Alice, & Tegen, Suzanne. Distributed Wind Soft Costs: A Beginning. United States.
Jimenez, Tony, Forsyth,Trudy, Preus, Robert, Christol, Corrie, Orrell, Alice, and Tegen, Suzanne. 2016. "Distributed Wind Soft Costs: A Beginning". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1261991.
@article{osti_1261991,
title = {Distributed Wind Soft Costs: A Beginning},
author = {Jimenez, Tony and Forsyth,Trudy and Preus, Robert and Christol, Corrie and Orrell, Alice and Tegen, Suzanne},
abstractNote = {Tony Jimenez presented this overview of distributed wind soft costs at the 2016 Small Wind Conference in Stevens Point, Wisconsin, on June 14, 2016. Soft costs are any non-hardware project costs, such as costs related to permitting fees, installer/developer profit, taxes, transaction costs, permitting, installation, indirect corporate costs, installation labor, and supply chain costs. This presentation provides an overview of soft costs, a distributed wind project taxonomy (of which soft costs are a subset), an alpha data set project demographics, data summary, and future work in this area.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}

Conference:
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