skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Testing for Controlled Rapid Pressurization

Abstract

Borehole W1 is a NQ core hole drilled at our test site in Socorro. The rock is rhyolite. Borehole W1 which was used to test gas-gas explosive mixtures is 55 feet deep with casing (pinkish in the drawing) set to 35 feet. The model is a representation of the borehole and the holes we cored around the central borehole after the test. The brown colored core holes showed dye when we filled W1 with water and slightly pressurized it. This indicates there was some path between W1 and the colored core hole. The core holes are shown to their TD in the drawing. The green plane is a fracture plane which we believe is the result of the explosions of the gas mixture in W1. Data resource is a 2D .pdf Solid Works Drawing of borehole w-1

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
DOE Geothermal Data Repository; Sandia National Laboratories
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Geothermal Technologies Program (EE-2C)
Contributing Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories
OSTI Identifier:
1261929
Report Number(s):
457
DOE Contract Number:
FY14 AOP 1.1.0.18
Resource Type:
Data
Data Type:
Figures/Plots
Country of Publication:
United States
Availability:
GDRHelp@EE.Doe.Gov
Language:
English
Subject:
15 Geothermal Energy; geothermal; Pressurization; EGS; Gas-Gas; Socorro test site; rhyolite; Gas-Gas Pressurization

Citation Formats

Steven Knudsen. Testing for Controlled Rapid Pressurization. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.15121/1261929.
Steven Knudsen. Testing for Controlled Rapid Pressurization. United States. doi:10.15121/1261929.
Steven Knudsen. Wed . "Testing for Controlled Rapid Pressurization". United States. doi:10.15121/1261929. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1261929.
@article{osti_1261929,
title = {Testing for Controlled Rapid Pressurization},
author = {Steven Knudsen},
abstractNote = {Borehole W1 is a NQ core hole drilled at our test site in Socorro. The rock is rhyolite. Borehole W1 which was used to test gas-gas explosive mixtures is 55 feet deep with casing (pinkish in the drawing) set to 35 feet. The model is a representation of the borehole and the holes we cored around the central borehole after the test. The brown colored core holes showed dye when we filled W1 with water and slightly pressurized it. This indicates there was some path between W1 and the colored core hole. The core holes are shown to their TD in the drawing. The green plane is a fracture plane which we believe is the result of the explosions of the gas mixture in W1. Data resource is a 2D .pdf Solid Works Drawing of borehole w-1},
doi = {10.15121/1261929},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Sep 03 00:00:00 EDT 2014},
month = {Wed Sep 03 00:00:00 EDT 2014}
}

Dataset:

Save / Share:
  • Cited by 3
  • A two phase, one dimensional, Lagrange hydrodynamic program has been developed to compute the response of a porous bed to rapid gas pressurization. It has been used to investigate plug formation in porous beds, starting with different initial values for density (percent TMD), with different initial sized granulations (particle size), and with different values for material yield (flow) stress. The program is based upon a chain of finite element cells each of which represent the porous media with equations that assume the closure of a spherical pore. Gas flow is then treated with difference equations derived from the differential equationsmore » for adiabatic flow with friction in a circular duct. Since the cell definition includes discrete gas volume and gas flow area, the choice of calculational cell size is equivalent to the choice of a unique physical system, i.e., initial density and granulation. Calculational results are compared to data obtained on granulated rocket motor propellants in plastic pipe deflagration to detonation transition (DDT) experiments. These materials are very compliant. Experimental pressurization rates associated with detonation are shown to be of similar magnitude to the calculated pressurization rates that lead to the formation of a forward moving compaction plug. Calculational results are also compared with data from a DDT tube experiment performed on Winchester 231 reloading powder, a much less compliant material. A pressurization rate can be selected for which the calculated compaction front velocity agrees well with the experimentally observed luminous front velocity from the streak camera record. Also, the calculated displacement profiles are in reasonable agreement with experimental displacement profiles observed in x-ray photographs.« less
  • It has previously been established that multiple hydraulic fractures can be created from a single borehole by high-rate, high-pressure, pulsed-fracture treatment. It was the objective of the project to quantitatively understand the process by a combined experimental-theoretical program. A fracture initiation model was developed based on a coupled pore pressure-stress formalism and classical mode I flaw opening concepts. The dependence of fracture initiation on pressurization rate, peak pressure, and the physical parameters of the formation and frac fluid, which is contained within the formalism, is evaluated. A simple fracture propagation model has been used in conjunction with the fracture initiationmore » model to aid in defining multiple fracture-experiment design parameters, and indicates that borehole storage effects can play a major role in initial fracture extension.« less
  • Tight oil and gas reservoirs often require stimulation in order to make economic exploitation possible. Tailored pulse loading, usually by downhole use of propellants or explosives, has been studied as a means of improving production in these reservoirs. This paper presents an overview of the first year's effort on a three-year combined theoretical-experimental research program to develop a systematic understanding of the tailored pulse loading/fracturing phenomena. The project is designed to address the sensitivity of multiple fracture initiation and propagation to rock and fluid properties and pressurization history. The results will ultimately contribute to the design procedures for field applications.