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Title: Quality New Mexico Performance Excellence Award Roadrunner Application 2016

Abstract

The Human Resources (HR) Division is a critical part of Los Alamos National Laboratory, an internationally recognized science and R&D facility with a specialized workforce of more than 10,000. The Laboratory’s mission is to solve national security challenges through scientific excellence. The HR Division partners with employees and managers to support the Laboratory in hiring, retaining, and motivating an exceptional workforce. The Laboratory is owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), with oversight by the DOE’s National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). In 2006, NNSA awarded the contract for managing and operating the Laboratory to Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS), and a for-profit consortium. This report expounds on performance excellence efforts, presenting a strategic plan and operations.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1261791
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-16-24672
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS; Contractor Assurance

Citation Formats

Petru, Ernest Frank. Quality New Mexico Performance Excellence Award Roadrunner Application 2016. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1261791.
Petru, Ernest Frank. Quality New Mexico Performance Excellence Award Roadrunner Application 2016. United States. doi:10.2172/1261791.
Petru, Ernest Frank. 2016. "Quality New Mexico Performance Excellence Award Roadrunner Application 2016". United States. doi:10.2172/1261791. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1261791.
@article{osti_1261791,
title = {Quality New Mexico Performance Excellence Award Roadrunner Application 2016},
author = {Petru, Ernest Frank},
abstractNote = {The Human Resources (HR) Division is a critical part of Los Alamos National Laboratory, an internationally recognized science and R&D facility with a specialized workforce of more than 10,000. The Laboratory’s mission is to solve national security challenges through scientific excellence. The HR Division partners with employees and managers to support the Laboratory in hiring, retaining, and motivating an exceptional workforce. The Laboratory is owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), with oversight by the DOE’s National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). In 2006, NNSA awarded the contract for managing and operating the Laboratory to Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS), and a for-profit consortium. This report expounds on performance excellence efforts, presenting a strategic plan and operations.},
doi = {10.2172/1261791},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}

Technical Report:

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