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Title: Uniform corrosion of FeCrAl alloys in LWR coolant environments

Abstract

The corrosion behavior of commercial and model FeCrAl alloys and type 310 stainless steel was examined by autoclave tests and compared to Zircaloy-4, the reference cladding materials in light water reactors. The corrosion studies were carried out in three distinct water chemistry environments found in pressurized and boiling water reactor primary coolant loop conditions for up to one year. The structure and morphology of the oxides formed on the surface of these alloys was consistent with thermodynamic predictions. Spinel-type oxides were found to be present after hydrogen water chemistry exposures, while the oxygenated water tests resulted in the formation of very thin and protective hematite-type oxides. Unlike the alloys exposed to oxygenated water tests, the alloys tested in hydrogen water chemistry conditions experienced mass loss as a function of time. This mass loss was the result of net sum of mass gain due to parabolic oxidation and mass loss due to dissolution that also exhibits parabolic kinetics. Finally, the maximum thickness loss after one year of LWR water corrosion in the absence of irradiation was ~2 μm, which is inconsequential for a ~300–500 μm thick cladding.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  2. GE Global Research Center, Schenectady, NY (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE); USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1261309
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Nuclear Materials
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 479; Journal ID: ISSN 0022-3115
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Terrani, K. A., Pint, B. A., Kim, Y. -J., Unocic, K. A., Yang, Y., Silva, C. M., Meyer, III, H. M., and Rebak, R. B.. Uniform corrosion of FeCrAl alloys in LWR coolant environments. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.jnucmat.2016.06.047.
Terrani, K. A., Pint, B. A., Kim, Y. -J., Unocic, K. A., Yang, Y., Silva, C. M., Meyer, III, H. M., & Rebak, R. B.. Uniform corrosion of FeCrAl alloys in LWR coolant environments. United States. doi:10.1016/j.jnucmat.2016.06.047.
Terrani, K. A., Pint, B. A., Kim, Y. -J., Unocic, K. A., Yang, Y., Silva, C. M., Meyer, III, H. M., and Rebak, R. B.. 2016. "Uniform corrosion of FeCrAl alloys in LWR coolant environments". United States. doi:10.1016/j.jnucmat.2016.06.047. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1261309.
@article{osti_1261309,
title = {Uniform corrosion of FeCrAl alloys in LWR coolant environments},
author = {Terrani, K. A. and Pint, B. A. and Kim, Y. -J. and Unocic, K. A. and Yang, Y. and Silva, C. M. and Meyer, III, H. M. and Rebak, R. B.},
abstractNote = {The corrosion behavior of commercial and model FeCrAl alloys and type 310 stainless steel was examined by autoclave tests and compared to Zircaloy-4, the reference cladding materials in light water reactors. The corrosion studies were carried out in three distinct water chemistry environments found in pressurized and boiling water reactor primary coolant loop conditions for up to one year. The structure and morphology of the oxides formed on the surface of these alloys was consistent with thermodynamic predictions. Spinel-type oxides were found to be present after hydrogen water chemistry exposures, while the oxygenated water tests resulted in the formation of very thin and protective hematite-type oxides. Unlike the alloys exposed to oxygenated water tests, the alloys tested in hydrogen water chemistry conditions experienced mass loss as a function of time. This mass loss was the result of net sum of mass gain due to parabolic oxidation and mass loss due to dissolution that also exhibits parabolic kinetics. Finally, the maximum thickness loss after one year of LWR water corrosion in the absence of irradiation was ~2 μm, which is inconsequential for a ~300–500 μm thick cladding.},
doi = {10.1016/j.jnucmat.2016.06.047},
journal = {Journal of Nuclear Materials},
number = ,
volume = 479,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}

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Cited by: 5works
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