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Title: Bile salt receptor complex activates a pathogenic type III secretion system

Abstract

Bile is an important component of the human gastrointestinal tract with an essential role in food absorption and antimicrobial activities. Enteric bacterial pathogens have developed strategies to sense bile as an environmental cue to regulate virulence genes during infection. We discovered that Vibrio parahaemolyticus VtrC, along with VtrA and VtrB, are required for activating the virulence type III secretion system 2 in response to bile salts. The VtrA/VtrC complex activates VtrB in the presence of bile salts. The crystal structure of the periplasmic domains of the VtrA/VtrC heterodimer reveals a β-barrel with a hydrophobic inner chamber. A co-crystal structure of VtrA/VtrC with bile salt, along with biophysical and mutational analysis, demonstrates that the hydrophobic chamber binds bile salts and activates the virulence network. As part of a family of conserved signaling receptors, VtrA/VtrC provides structural and functional insights into the evolutionarily conserved mechanism used by bacteria to sense their environment.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [1]; ORCiD logo [3];  [4]; ORCiD logo [5]
  1. Department of Molecular Biology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States
  2. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States
  3. Department of Biochemistry, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States, Department of Biophysics, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States
  4. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States, Department of Biochemistry, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States, Department of Biophysics, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States
  5. Department of Molecular Biology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States, Department of Biochemistry, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, United States
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1260282
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1260283
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
eLife
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 5; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-18 20:28:29; Journal ID: ISSN 2050-084X
Publisher:
eLife Sciences Publications, Ltd.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Li, Peng, Rivera-Cancel, Giomar, Kinch, Lisa N., Salomon, Dor, Tomchick, Diana R., Grishin, Nick V., and Orth, Kim. Bile salt receptor complex activates a pathogenic type III secretion system. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.7554/eLife.15718.
Li, Peng, Rivera-Cancel, Giomar, Kinch, Lisa N., Salomon, Dor, Tomchick, Diana R., Grishin, Nick V., & Orth, Kim. Bile salt receptor complex activates a pathogenic type III secretion system. United States. doi:10.7554/eLife.15718.
Li, Peng, Rivera-Cancel, Giomar, Kinch, Lisa N., Salomon, Dor, Tomchick, Diana R., Grishin, Nick V., and Orth, Kim. Tue . "Bile salt receptor complex activates a pathogenic type III secretion system". United States. doi:10.7554/eLife.15718.
@article{osti_1260282,
title = {Bile salt receptor complex activates a pathogenic type III secretion system},
author = {Li, Peng and Rivera-Cancel, Giomar and Kinch, Lisa N. and Salomon, Dor and Tomchick, Diana R. and Grishin, Nick V. and Orth, Kim},
abstractNote = {Bile is an important component of the human gastrointestinal tract with an essential role in food absorption and antimicrobial activities. Enteric bacterial pathogens have developed strategies to sense bile as an environmental cue to regulate virulence genes during infection. We discovered that Vibrio parahaemolyticus VtrC, along with VtrA and VtrB, are required for activating the virulence type III secretion system 2 in response to bile salts. The VtrA/VtrC complex activates VtrB in the presence of bile salts. The crystal structure of the periplasmic domains of the VtrA/VtrC heterodimer reveals a β-barrel with a hydrophobic inner chamber. A co-crystal structure of VtrA/VtrC with bile salt, along with biophysical and mutational analysis, demonstrates that the hydrophobic chamber binds bile salts and activates the virulence network. As part of a family of conserved signaling receptors, VtrA/VtrC provides structural and functional insights into the evolutionarily conserved mechanism used by bacteria to sense their environment.},
doi = {10.7554/eLife.15718},
journal = {eLife},
number = ,
volume = 5,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jul 05 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Tue Jul 05 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.7554/eLife.15718

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 8works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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  • Bile is an important component of the human gastrointestinal tract with an essential role in food absorption and antimicrobial activities. Enteric bacterial pathogens have developed strategies to sense bile as an environmental cue to regulate virulence genes during infection. We discovered thatVibrio parahaemolyticusVtrC, along with VtrA and VtrB, are required for activating the virulence type III secretion system 2 in response to bile salts. The VtrA/VtrC complex activates VtrB in the presence of bile salts. The crystal structure of the periplasmic domains of the VtrA/VtrC heterodimer reveals a β-barrel with a hydrophobic inner chamber. A co-crystal structure of VtrA/VtrC withmore » bile salt, along with biophysical and mutational analysis, demonstrates that the hydrophobic chamber binds bile salts and activates the virulence network. As part of a family of conserved signaling receptors, VtrA/VtrC provides structural and functional insights into the evolutionarily conserved mechanism used by bacteria to sense their environment.« less
  • Bile is an important component of the human gastrointestinal tract with an essential role in food absorption and antimicrobial activities. Enteric bacterial pathogens have developed strategies to sense bile as an environmental cue to regulate virulence genes during infection. We discovered that Vibrio parahaemolyticus VtrC, along with VtrA and VtrB, are required for activating the virulence type III secretion system 2 in response to bile salts. The VtrA/VtrC complex activates VtrB in the presence of bile salts. The crystal structure of the periplasmic domains of the VtrA/VtrC heterodimer reveals a β-barrel with a hydrophobic inner chamber. A co-crystal structure ofmore » VtrA/VtrC with bile salt, along with biophysical and mutational analysis, demonstrates that the hydrophobic chamber binds bile salts and activates the virulence network. As part of a family of conserved signaling receptors, VtrA/VtrC provides structural and functional insights into the evolutionarily conserved mechanism used by bacteria to sense their environment.« less
    Cited by 8
  • Many Gram-negative bacteria colonize and exploit host niches using a protein apparatus called a type III secretion system (T3SS) that translocates bacterial effector proteins into host cells where their functions are essential for pathogenesis. A suite of T3SS-associated chaperone proteins bind cargo in the bacterial cytosol, establishing protein interaction networks needed for effector translocation into host cells. In Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, a T3SS encoded in a large genomic island (SPI-2) is required for intracellular infection, but the chaperone complement required for effector translocation by this system is not known. Using a reverse genetics approach, we identified a multi-cargo secretionmore » chaperone that is functionally integrated with the SPI-2-encoded T3SS and required for systemic infection in mice. Crystallographic analysis of SrcA at a resolution of 2.5 {angstrom} revealed a dimer similar to the CesT chaperone from enteropathogenic E. coli but lacking a 17-amino acid extension at the carboxyl terminus. Further biochemical and quantitative proteomics data revealed three protein interactions with SrcA, including two effector cargos (SseL and PipB2) and the type III-associated ATPase, SsaN, that increases the efficiency of effector translocation. Using competitive infections in mice we show that SrcA increases bacterial fitness during host infection, highlighting the in vivo importance of effector chaperones for the SPI-2 T3SS.« less
  • In the type III secretion system (T3SS) of Aeromonas hydrophila, the putative needle complex subunit AscF requires both putative chaperones AscE and AscG for formation of a ternary complex to avoid premature assembly. Here we report the crystal structure of AscE at 2.7 A resolution and the mapping of buried regions of AscE, AscG, and AscF in the AscEG and AscEFG complexes using limited protease digestion. The dimeric AscE is comprised of two helix-turn-helix monomers packed in an antiparallel fashion. The N-terminal 13 residues of AscE are buried only upon binding with AscG, but this region is found to bemore » nonessential for the interaction. AscE functions as a monomer and can be coexpressed with AscG or with both AscG and AscF to form soluble complexes. The AscE binding region of AscG in the AscEG complex is identified to be within the N-terminal 61 residues of AscG. The exposed C-terminal substrate-binding region of AscG in the AscEG complex is induced to be buried only upon binding to AscF. However, the N-terminal 52 residues of AscF remain exposed even in the ternary AscEFG complex. On the other hand, the 35-residue C-terminal region of AscF in the complex is resistant to protease digestion in the AscEFG complex. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that two C-terminal hydrophobic residues, Ile83 and Leu84, of AscF are essential for chaperone binding.« less
  • The plague-causing bacterium Yersinia pestis utilizes a type III secretion system to deliver effector proteins into mammalian cells where they interfere with signal transduction pathways that mediate phagocytosis and the inflammatory response. Effector proteins are injected through a hollow needle structure composed of the protein YscF. YscG and YscE act as 'chaperones' to prevent premature polymerization of YscF in the cytosol of the bacterium prior to assembly of the needle. Here, we report the crystal structure of the YscEFG protein complex at 1.8 {angstrom} resolution. Overall, the structure is similar to that of the analogous PscEFG complex from the Pseudomonasmore » aeruginosa type III secretion system, but there are noteworthy differences. The structure confirms that, like PscG, YscG is a member of the tetratricopeptide repeat family of proteins. YscG binds tightly to the C-terminal half of YscF, implying that it is this region of YscF that controls its polymerization into the needle structure. YscE interacts with the N-terminal tetratricopeptide repeat motif of YscG but makes very little direct contact with YscF. Its function may be to stabilize the structure of YscG and/or to participate in recruiting the complex to the secretion apparatus. No electron density could be observed for the 49 N-terminal residues of YscF. This and additional evidence suggest that the N-terminus of YscF is disordered in the complex with YscE and YscG. As expected, conserved residues in the C-terminal half of YscF mediate important intra- and intermolecular interactions in the complex. Moreover, the phenotypes of some previously characterized mutations in the C-terminal half of YscF can be rationalized in terms of the structure of the heterotrimeric YscEFG complex.« less