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Title: Laboratory Scale Coal And Biomass To Drop-In Fuels (CBDF) Production And Assessment

Abstract

This Final Technical Report describes the work and accomplishments of the project entitled, “Laboratory Scale Coal and Biomass to Drop-In Fuels (CBDF) Production and Assessment.” The main objective of the project was to fabricate and test a lab-scale liquid-fuel production system using coal containing different percentages of biomass such as corn stover and switchgrass at a rate of 2 liters per day. The system utilizes the patented Altex fuel-production technology, which incorporates advanced catalysts developed by Pennsylvania State University. The system was designed, fabricated, tested, and assessed for economic and environmental feasibility relative to competing technologies.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. Altex Technologies Corporation, Sunnyvale, CA (United States)
  2. Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Altex Technologies Corporation, Sunnyvale, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE)
OSTI Identifier:
1259873
Report Number(s):
DOE-Altex-10427
DOE Contract Number:
FE0010427
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
10 SYNTHETIC FUELS; 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 09 BIOMASS FUELS; Coal; Biomass; Fuel

Citation Formats

Lux, Kenneth, Imam, Tahmina, Chevanan, Nehru, Namazian, Mehdi, Wang, Xiaoxing, and Song, Chunshan. Laboratory Scale Coal And Biomass To Drop-In Fuels (CBDF) Production And Assessment. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1259873.
Lux, Kenneth, Imam, Tahmina, Chevanan, Nehru, Namazian, Mehdi, Wang, Xiaoxing, & Song, Chunshan. Laboratory Scale Coal And Biomass To Drop-In Fuels (CBDF) Production And Assessment. United States. doi:10.2172/1259873.
Lux, Kenneth, Imam, Tahmina, Chevanan, Nehru, Namazian, Mehdi, Wang, Xiaoxing, and Song, Chunshan. 2016. "Laboratory Scale Coal And Biomass To Drop-In Fuels (CBDF) Production And Assessment". United States. doi:10.2172/1259873. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1259873.
@article{osti_1259873,
title = {Laboratory Scale Coal And Biomass To Drop-In Fuels (CBDF) Production And Assessment},
author = {Lux, Kenneth and Imam, Tahmina and Chevanan, Nehru and Namazian, Mehdi and Wang, Xiaoxing and Song, Chunshan},
abstractNote = {This Final Technical Report describes the work and accomplishments of the project entitled, “Laboratory Scale Coal and Biomass to Drop-In Fuels (CBDF) Production and Assessment.” The main objective of the project was to fabricate and test a lab-scale liquid-fuel production system using coal containing different percentages of biomass such as corn stover and switchgrass at a rate of 2 liters per day. The system utilizes the patented Altex fuel-production technology, which incorporates advanced catalysts developed by Pennsylvania State University. The system was designed, fabricated, tested, and assessed for economic and environmental feasibility relative to competing technologies.},
doi = {10.2172/1259873},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}

Technical Report:

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