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Title: Investigation of Portable Event-Based Monte Carlo Transport Using the NVIDIA Thrust Library

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1259778
Report Number(s):
LLNL-CONF-681383
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at: 2016 American Nuclear Society Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA, United States, Jun 12 - Jun 16, 2016
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 22 GENERAL STUDIES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS; 97 MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Bleile, R C, Brantley, P S, Dawson, S A, O'Brien, M J, and Childs, H. Investigation of Portable Event-Based Monte Carlo Transport Using the NVIDIA Thrust Library. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Bleile, R C, Brantley, P S, Dawson, S A, O'Brien, M J, & Childs, H. Investigation of Portable Event-Based Monte Carlo Transport Using the NVIDIA Thrust Library. United States.
Bleile, R C, Brantley, P S, Dawson, S A, O'Brien, M J, and Childs, H. Mon . "Investigation of Portable Event-Based Monte Carlo Transport Using the NVIDIA Thrust Library". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1259778.
@article{osti_1259778,
title = {Investigation of Portable Event-Based Monte Carlo Transport Using the NVIDIA Thrust Library},
author = {Bleile, R C and Brantley, P S and Dawson, S A and O'Brien, M J and Childs, H},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 25 00:00:00 EST 2016},
month = {Mon Jan 25 00:00:00 EST 2016}
}

Conference:
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  • The traditional form of parallelism in Monte Carlo particle transport simulations, wherein each individual particle history is considered a unit of work, does not lend itself well to data-level parallelism. Event-based algorithms, which were originally used for simulations on vector processors, may offer a path toward better utilizing data-level parallelism in modern computer architectures. In this study, a simple model is developed for estimating the efficiency of the event-based particle transport algorithm under two sets of assumptions. Data collected from simulations of four reactor problems using OpenMC was then used in conjunction with the models to calculate the speedup duemore » to vectorization as a function of two parameters: the size of the particle bank and the vector width. When each event type is assumed to have constant execution time, the achievable speedup is directly related to the particle bank size. We observed that the bank size generally needs to be at least 20 times greater than vector size in order to achieve vector efficiency greater than 90%. When the execution times for events are allowed to vary, however, the vector speedup is also limited by differences in execution time for events being carried out in a single event-iteration. For some problems, this implies that vector effciencies over 50% may not be attainable. While there are many factors impacting performance of an event-based algorithm that are not captured by our model, it nevertheless provides insights into factors that may be limiting in a real implementation.« less
  • Monte Carlo particle transport is easy to implement on massively parallel computers relative to other methods of transport simulation. This paper describes experiences of implementing a realistic demonstration Monte Carlo code on a variety of parallel architectures. Our pool of tasks'' technique, which allows reproducibility from run to run regardless of the number of processors, is discussed. We present detailed timing studies of simulations performed on the 128 processor BBN-ACI TC2000 and preliminary timing results for the 32 processor Kendall Square Research KSR-1. Given sufficient workload to distribute across many computational nodes, the BBN achieves nearly linear speedup for amore » large number of nodes. The KSR, with which we have had less experience, performs poorly with more than ten processors. A simple model incorporating known causes of overhead accurately predicts observed behavior. A general-purpose communication and control package to facilitate the implementation of existing Monte Carlo packages is described together with timings on the BBN. This package adds insignificantly to the computational costs of parallel simulations.« less
  • Monte Carlo particle transport is easy to implement on massively parallel computers relative to other methods of transport simulation. This paper describes experiences of implementing a realistic demonstration Monte Carlo code on a variety of parallel architectures. Our ``pool of tasks`` technique, which allows reproducibility from run to run regardless of the number of processors, is discussed. We present detailed timing studies of simulations performed on the 128 processor BBN-ACI TC2000 and preliminary timing results for the 32 processor Kendall Square Research KSR-1. Given sufficient workload to distribute across many computational nodes, the BBN achieves nearly linear speedup for amore » large number of nodes. The KSR, with which we have had less experience, performs poorly with more than ten processors. A simple model incorporating known causes of overhead accurately predicts observed behavior. A general-purpose communication and control package to facilitate the implementation of existing Monte Carlo packages is described together with timings on the BBN. This package adds insignificantly to the computational costs of parallel simulations.« less
  • No abstract prepared.