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Title: Announcing Supercomputer Summit

Abstract

Summit is the next leap in leadership-class computing systems for open science. With Summit we will be able to address, with greater complexity and higher fidelity, questions concerning who we are, our place on earth, and in our universe. Summit will deliver more than five times the computational performance of Titan’s 18,688 nodes, using only approximately 3,400 nodes when it arrives in 2017. Like Titan, Summit will have a hybrid architecture, and each node will contain multiple IBM POWER9 CPUs and NVIDIA Volta GPUs all connected together with NVIDIA’s high-speed NVLink. Each node will have over half a terabyte of coherent memory (high bandwidth memory + DDR4) addressable by all CPUs and GPUs plus 800GB of non-volatile RAM that can be used as a burst buffer or as extended memory. To provide a high rate of I/O throughput, the nodes will be connected in a non-blocking fat-tree using a dual-rail Mellanox EDR InfiniBand interconnect. Upon completion, Summit will allow researchers in all fields of science unprecedented access to solving some of the world’s most pressing challenges.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1259664
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING; SUMMIT; SUPERCOMPUTING; TITAN; CPU; GPU

Citation Formats

Wells, Jack, Bland, Buddy, Nichols, Jeff, Hack, Jim, Foertter, Fernanda, Hagen, Gaute, Maier, Thomas, Ashfaq, Moetasim, Messer, Bronson, and Parete-Koon, Suzanne. Announcing Supercomputer Summit. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Wells, Jack, Bland, Buddy, Nichols, Jeff, Hack, Jim, Foertter, Fernanda, Hagen, Gaute, Maier, Thomas, Ashfaq, Moetasim, Messer, Bronson, & Parete-Koon, Suzanne. Announcing Supercomputer Summit. United States.
Wells, Jack, Bland, Buddy, Nichols, Jeff, Hack, Jim, Foertter, Fernanda, Hagen, Gaute, Maier, Thomas, Ashfaq, Moetasim, Messer, Bronson, and Parete-Koon, Suzanne. 2016. "Announcing Supercomputer Summit". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1259664.
@article{osti_1259664,
title = {Announcing Supercomputer Summit},
author = {Wells, Jack and Bland, Buddy and Nichols, Jeff and Hack, Jim and Foertter, Fernanda and Hagen, Gaute and Maier, Thomas and Ashfaq, Moetasim and Messer, Bronson and Parete-Koon, Suzanne},
abstractNote = {Summit is the next leap in leadership-class computing systems for open science. With Summit we will be able to address, with greater complexity and higher fidelity, questions concerning who we are, our place on earth, and in our universe. Summit will deliver more than five times the computational performance of Titan’s 18,688 nodes, using only approximately 3,400 nodes when it arrives in 2017. Like Titan, Summit will have a hybrid architecture, and each node will contain multiple IBM POWER9 CPUs and NVIDIA Volta GPUs all connected together with NVIDIA’s high-speed NVLink. Each node will have over half a terabyte of coherent memory (high bandwidth memory + DDR4) addressable by all CPUs and GPUs plus 800GB of non-volatile RAM that can be used as a burst buffer or as extended memory. To provide a high rate of I/O throughput, the nodes will be connected in a non-blocking fat-tree using a dual-rail Mellanox EDR InfiniBand interconnect. Upon completion, Summit will allow researchers in all fields of science unprecedented access to solving some of the world’s most pressing challenges.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
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