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Title: Simulation-Based and Analytical Models for Energy Use Prediction

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program
OSTI Identifier:
1259640
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-16-24437
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: ISC High Performance Conference ; 2016-06-23 - 2016-06-23 ; Frankfurt, Germany
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Computer Science

Citation Formats

Eidenbenz, Stephan Johannes, Djidjev, Hristo Nikolov, Nadiga, Balasubramanya T., and Park, Eun Jung. Simulation-Based and Analytical Models for Energy Use Prediction. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Eidenbenz, Stephan Johannes, Djidjev, Hristo Nikolov, Nadiga, Balasubramanya T., & Park, Eun Jung. Simulation-Based and Analytical Models for Energy Use Prediction. United States.
Eidenbenz, Stephan Johannes, Djidjev, Hristo Nikolov, Nadiga, Balasubramanya T., and Park, Eun Jung. 2016. "Simulation-Based and Analytical Models for Energy Use Prediction". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1259640.
@article{osti_1259640,
title = {Simulation-Based and Analytical Models for Energy Use Prediction},
author = {Eidenbenz, Stephan Johannes and Djidjev, Hristo Nikolov and Nadiga, Balasubramanya T. and Park, Eun Jung},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}

Conference:
Other availability
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