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Title: Advanced accelerator and mm-wave structure research at LANL

Abstract

This document outlines acceleration projects and mm-wave structure research performed at LANL. The motivation for PBG research is described first, with reference to couplers for superconducting accelerators and structures for room-temperature accelerators and W-band TWTs. These topics are then taken up in greater detail: PBG structures and the MIT PBG accelerator; SRF PBG cavities at LANL; X-band PBG cavities at LANL; and W-band PBG TWT at LANL. The presentation concludes by describing other advanced accelerator projects: beam shaping with an Emittance Exchanger, diamond field emitter array cathodes, and additive manufacturing of novel accelerator structures.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1259638
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-16-24415
TRN: US1601530
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; LANL; ACCELERATORS; SUPERCONDUCTING CAVITY RESONATORS; TRAVELLING WAVE TUBES; BEAM SHAPING; WAKEFIELD ACCELERATORS; RESEARCH PROGRAMS

Citation Formats

Simakov, Evgenya Ivanovna. Advanced accelerator and mm-wave structure research at LANL. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1259638.
Simakov, Evgenya Ivanovna. Advanced accelerator and mm-wave structure research at LANL. United States. doi:10.2172/1259638.
Simakov, Evgenya Ivanovna. 2016. "Advanced accelerator and mm-wave structure research at LANL". United States. doi:10.2172/1259638. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1259638.
@article{osti_1259638,
title = {Advanced accelerator and mm-wave structure research at LANL},
author = {Simakov, Evgenya Ivanovna},
abstractNote = {This document outlines acceleration projects and mm-wave structure research performed at LANL. The motivation for PBG research is described first, with reference to couplers for superconducting accelerators and structures for room-temperature accelerators and W-band TWTs. These topics are then taken up in greater detail: PBG structures and the MIT PBG accelerator; SRF PBG cavities at LANL; X-band PBG cavities at LANL; and W-band PBG TWT at LANL. The presentation concludes by describing other advanced accelerator projects: beam shaping with an Emittance Exchanger, diamond field emitter array cathodes, and additive manufacturing of novel accelerator structures.},
doi = {10.2172/1259638},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}

Technical Report:

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