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Title: Enhanced Passive Cooling for Waterless-Power Production Technologies

Abstract

Recent advances in the literature and at SNL indicate the strong potential for passive, specialized surfaces to significantly enhance power production output. Our exploratory computational and experimental research indicates that fractal and swirl surfaces can help enable waterless-power production by increasing the amount of heat transfer and turbulence, when compared with conventional surfaces. Small modular reactors, advanced reactors, and non-nuclear plants (e.g., solar and coal) are ideally suited for sCO2 coolant loops. The sCO2 loop converts the thermal heat into electricity, while the specialized surfaces passively and securely reject the waste process heat in an environmentally benign manner. The resultant, integrated energy systems are highly suitable for small grids, rural areas, and arid regions.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1259565
Report Number(s):
SAND-2016-5923R; SAND-NO.-2016-3379PR
642385; TRN: US1601526
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; 14 SOLAR ENERGY; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; COOLANT LOOPS; PROCESS HEAT; REMOVAL; POWER GENERATION; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; SURFACES; COAL; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; HEAT TRANSFER; COOLING; RURAL AREAS; AUGMENTATION; ELECTRIC POWER; FRACTALS; ARID LANDS; TURBULENCE; FOSSIL-FUEL POWER PLANTS; SOLAR POWER PLANTS

Citation Formats

Rodriguez, Salvador B. Enhanced Passive Cooling for Waterless-Power Production Technologies. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1259565.
Rodriguez, Salvador B. Enhanced Passive Cooling for Waterless-Power Production Technologies. United States. doi:10.2172/1259565.
Rodriguez, Salvador B. 2016. "Enhanced Passive Cooling for Waterless-Power Production Technologies". United States. doi:10.2172/1259565. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1259565.
@article{osti_1259565,
title = {Enhanced Passive Cooling for Waterless-Power Production Technologies},
author = {Rodriguez, Salvador B.},
abstractNote = {Recent advances in the literature and at SNL indicate the strong potential for passive, specialized surfaces to significantly enhance power production output. Our exploratory computational and experimental research indicates that fractal and swirl surfaces can help enable waterless-power production by increasing the amount of heat transfer and turbulence, when compared with conventional surfaces. Small modular reactors, advanced reactors, and non-nuclear plants (e.g., solar and coal) are ideally suited for sCO2 coolant loops. The sCO2 loop converts the thermal heat into electricity, while the specialized surfaces passively and securely reject the waste process heat in an environmentally benign manner. The resultant, integrated energy systems are highly suitable for small grids, rural areas, and arid regions.},
doi = {10.2172/1259565},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}

Technical Report:

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