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Title: Gas-phase detection of solid-state fission product complexes for post-detonation nuclear forensic analysis

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1259322
Grant/Contract Number:
NA0001983
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 310; Journal Issue: 3; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2016-11-17 04:58:02; Journal ID: ISSN 0236-5731
Publisher:
Springer Science + Business Media
Country of Publication:
Hungary
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Stratz, S. Adam, Jones, Steven A., Oldham, Colton J., Mullen, Austin D., Jones, Ashlyn V., Auxier, John D., and Hall, Howard L. Gas-phase detection of solid-state fission product complexes for post-detonation nuclear forensic analysis. Hungary: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1007/s10967-016-4920-4.
Stratz, S. Adam, Jones, Steven A., Oldham, Colton J., Mullen, Austin D., Jones, Ashlyn V., Auxier, John D., & Hall, Howard L. Gas-phase detection of solid-state fission product complexes for post-detonation nuclear forensic analysis. Hungary. doi:10.1007/s10967-016-4920-4.
Stratz, S. Adam, Jones, Steven A., Oldham, Colton J., Mullen, Austin D., Jones, Ashlyn V., Auxier, John D., and Hall, Howard L. 2016. "Gas-phase detection of solid-state fission product complexes for post-detonation nuclear forensic analysis". Hungary. doi:10.1007/s10967-016-4920-4.
@article{osti_1259322,
title = {Gas-phase detection of solid-state fission product complexes for post-detonation nuclear forensic analysis},
author = {Stratz, S. Adam and Jones, Steven A. and Oldham, Colton J. and Mullen, Austin D. and Jones, Ashlyn V. and Auxier, John D. and Hall, Howard L.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1007/s10967-016-4920-4},
journal = {Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry},
number = 3,
volume = 310,
place = {Hungary},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1007/s10967-016-4920-4

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 2works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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