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Title: Seismic SMHD -- Rotational Sensor Development and Deployment

Abstract

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Applied Technology Associates (ATA) are funding development and deployment of a new generation of rotational sensors for validation of rotational seismic applications. The sensors employ Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) principles with broadband response, high dynamic range, low noise floor, proven ruggedness, and high repeatability. This paper presents current status of sensor development and deployment opportunities.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Applied Technology Associates
  2. Consultant
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Applied Technology Associates
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Geothermal Technologies Office (EE-4G)
OSTI Identifier:
1258768
Report Number(s):
16M0934
DOE Contract Number:
EE0005511
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 4th IWGoRS Meeting, Tutzing, Germany, 20-23 Jun 16
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; Magnetohydrodynamic, MHD, rotational seismometry

Citation Formats

Laughlin, Darren, Pierson, Bob, and Brune, Bob. Seismic SMHD -- Rotational Sensor Development and Deployment. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Laughlin, Darren, Pierson, Bob, & Brune, Bob. Seismic SMHD -- Rotational Sensor Development and Deployment. United States.
Laughlin, Darren, Pierson, Bob, and Brune, Bob. Mon . "Seismic SMHD -- Rotational Sensor Development and Deployment". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1258768.
@article{osti_1258768,
title = {Seismic SMHD -- Rotational Sensor Development and Deployment},
author = {Laughlin, Darren and Pierson, Bob and Brune, Bob},
abstractNote = {The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Applied Technology Associates (ATA) are funding development and deployment of a new generation of rotational sensors for validation of rotational seismic applications. The sensors employ Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) principles with broadband response, high dynamic range, low noise floor, proven ruggedness, and high repeatability. This paper presents current status of sensor development and deployment opportunities.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 20 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Mon Jun 20 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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