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Title: FDA drug labeling: rich resources to facilitate precision medicine, drug safety, and regulatory science

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1258728
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Drug Discovery Today
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 21; Journal Issue: 10; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2016-12-26 09:53:05; Journal ID: ISSN 1359-6446
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
Country unknown/Code not available
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Fang, Hong, Harris, Stephen C., Liu, Zhichao, Zhou, Guangxu, Zhang, Guoping, Xu, Joshua, Rosario, Lilliam, Howard, Paul C., and Tong, Weida. FDA drug labeling: rich resources to facilitate precision medicine, drug safety, and regulatory science. Country unknown/Code not available: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.drudis.2016.06.006.
Fang, Hong, Harris, Stephen C., Liu, Zhichao, Zhou, Guangxu, Zhang, Guoping, Xu, Joshua, Rosario, Lilliam, Howard, Paul C., & Tong, Weida. FDA drug labeling: rich resources to facilitate precision medicine, drug safety, and regulatory science. Country unknown/Code not available. doi:10.1016/j.drudis.2016.06.006.
Fang, Hong, Harris, Stephen C., Liu, Zhichao, Zhou, Guangxu, Zhang, Guoping, Xu, Joshua, Rosario, Lilliam, Howard, Paul C., and Tong, Weida. Sat . "FDA drug labeling: rich resources to facilitate precision medicine, drug safety, and regulatory science". Country unknown/Code not available. doi:10.1016/j.drudis.2016.06.006.
@article{osti_1258728,
title = {FDA drug labeling: rich resources to facilitate precision medicine, drug safety, and regulatory science},
author = {Fang, Hong and Harris, Stephen C. and Liu, Zhichao and Zhou, Guangxu and Zhang, Guoping and Xu, Joshua and Rosario, Lilliam and Howard, Paul C. and Tong, Weida},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.drudis.2016.06.006},
journal = {Drug Discovery Today},
number = 10,
volume = 21,
place = {Country unknown/Code not available},
year = {Sat Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Sat Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.drudis.2016.06.006

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
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