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Title: Full report of laser doppler velocimetry (Het-V) data, results , and analysis for pRad shot 0632

Abstract

This was a collaborative shot with AWE investigators Paul Willis-Patel, David Bell, Seth Grant, David Tarr, and James Richley. The shot was assembled in Los Alamos, after which David Bell set up the probe holder and finalized the alignment. The probe holder location and configuration was modified from previous years to make room for the laser illuminated visible imaging diagnostic. The LANL pRad PDV team was Dale Tupa, Amy Tainter, and Patrick Medina. This shot had three PDV probes: one aimed at the center, one aimed at a feature, one aimed at the reverse side of the shot. The shot also had 9 points of a spectroscopy diagnostic. The pRad team helped set up and field the spectroscopy, but did not help with any data analysis. (The support documentation for the PDV results includes a timing map for the spectroscopy.) Please direct questions on the velocimetry to Dale Tupa or Amy Tainter. The shot radiographs were classified, but the data from the optical diagnostics are not.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1258363
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-16-24375
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; PDV; Photon Doppler Velocimetry; proton radiography; Het-V

Citation Formats

Tupa, Dale, and Tainter, Amy Marie. Full report of laser doppler velocimetry (Het-V) data, results , and analysis for pRad shot 0632. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1258363.
Tupa, Dale, & Tainter, Amy Marie. Full report of laser doppler velocimetry (Het-V) data, results , and analysis for pRad shot 0632. United States. doi:10.2172/1258363.
Tupa, Dale, and Tainter, Amy Marie. 2016. "Full report of laser doppler velocimetry (Het-V) data, results , and analysis for pRad shot 0632". United States. doi:10.2172/1258363. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1258363.
@article{osti_1258363,
title = {Full report of laser doppler velocimetry (Het-V) data, results , and analysis for pRad shot 0632},
author = {Tupa, Dale and Tainter, Amy Marie},
abstractNote = {This was a collaborative shot with AWE investigators Paul Willis-Patel, David Bell, Seth Grant, David Tarr, and James Richley. The shot was assembled in Los Alamos, after which David Bell set up the probe holder and finalized the alignment. The probe holder location and configuration was modified from previous years to make room for the laser illuminated visible imaging diagnostic. The LANL pRad PDV team was Dale Tupa, Amy Tainter, and Patrick Medina. This shot had three PDV probes: one aimed at the center, one aimed at a feature, one aimed at the reverse side of the shot. The shot also had 9 points of a spectroscopy diagnostic. The pRad team helped set up and field the spectroscopy, but did not help with any data analysis. (The support documentation for the PDV results includes a timing map for the spectroscopy.) Please direct questions on the velocimetry to Dale Tupa or Amy Tainter. The shot radiographs were classified, but the data from the optical diagnostics are not.},
doi = {10.2172/1258363},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}

Technical Report:

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