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Title: Experimental Neutron Capture Rate Constraint Far from Stability

Authors:
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Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1257650
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0013039; AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Physical Review Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 116; Journal Issue: 24; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2016-12-23 08:31:37; Journal ID: ISSN 0031-9007
Publisher:
American Physical Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Liddick, S. N., Spyrou, A., Crider, B. P., Naqvi, F., Larsen, A. C., Guttormsen, M., Mumpower, M., Surman, R., Perdikakis, G., Bleuel, D. L., Couture, A., Crespo Campo, L., Dombos, A. C., Lewis, R., Mosby, S., Nikas, S., Prokop, C. J., Renstrom, T., Rubio, B., Siem, S., and Quinn, S. J.. Experimental Neutron Capture Rate Constraint Far from Stability. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.242502.
Liddick, S. N., Spyrou, A., Crider, B. P., Naqvi, F., Larsen, A. C., Guttormsen, M., Mumpower, M., Surman, R., Perdikakis, G., Bleuel, D. L., Couture, A., Crespo Campo, L., Dombos, A. C., Lewis, R., Mosby, S., Nikas, S., Prokop, C. J., Renstrom, T., Rubio, B., Siem, S., & Quinn, S. J.. Experimental Neutron Capture Rate Constraint Far from Stability. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.242502.
Liddick, S. N., Spyrou, A., Crider, B. P., Naqvi, F., Larsen, A. C., Guttormsen, M., Mumpower, M., Surman, R., Perdikakis, G., Bleuel, D. L., Couture, A., Crespo Campo, L., Dombos, A. C., Lewis, R., Mosby, S., Nikas, S., Prokop, C. J., Renstrom, T., Rubio, B., Siem, S., and Quinn, S. J.. 2016. "Experimental Neutron Capture Rate Constraint Far from Stability". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.242502.
@article{osti_1257650,
title = {Experimental Neutron Capture Rate Constraint Far from Stability},
author = {Liddick, S. N. and Spyrou, A. and Crider, B. P. and Naqvi, F. and Larsen, A. C. and Guttormsen, M. and Mumpower, M. and Surman, R. and Perdikakis, G. and Bleuel, D. L. and Couture, A. and Crespo Campo, L. and Dombos, A. C. and Lewis, R. and Mosby, S. and Nikas, S. and Prokop, C. J. and Renstrom, T. and Rubio, B. and Siem, S. and Quinn, S. J.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.242502},
journal = {Physical Review Letters},
number = 24,
volume = 116,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.242502

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 4works
Citation information provided by
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