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Title: Optimal Size Tradeoffs between Batteries and Photovoltaics for Expeditionary Energy Operations.

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOD
OSTI Identifier:
1257580
Report Number(s):
SAND2015-4669C
590751
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the 83rd MORS Symposium held June 22-25, 2015 in Alexandria, VA.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Smith, Mark A., Miner, Nadine E., Gayle R. Von Eckartsberg, and Col. James C. Caley. Optimal Size Tradeoffs between Batteries and Photovoltaics for Expeditionary Energy Operations.. United States: N. p., 2015. Web.
Smith, Mark A., Miner, Nadine E., Gayle R. Von Eckartsberg, & Col. James C. Caley. Optimal Size Tradeoffs between Batteries and Photovoltaics for Expeditionary Energy Operations.. United States.
Smith, Mark A., Miner, Nadine E., Gayle R. Von Eckartsberg, and Col. James C. Caley. Mon . "Optimal Size Tradeoffs between Batteries and Photovoltaics for Expeditionary Energy Operations.". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1257580.
@article{osti_1257580,
title = {Optimal Size Tradeoffs between Batteries and Photovoltaics for Expeditionary Energy Operations.},
author = {Smith, Mark A. and Miner, Nadine E. and Gayle R. Von Eckartsberg and Col. James C. Caley},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Mon Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}

Conference:
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