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Title: Energy Frontier Research With ATLAS: Final Report

Abstract

The Boston University (BU) group is playing key roles across the ATLAS experiment: in detector operations, the online trigger, the upgrade, computing, and physics analysis. Our team has been critical to the maintenance and operations of the muon system since its installation. During Run 1 we led the muon trigger group and that responsibility continues into Run 2. BU maintains and operates the ATLAS Northeast Tier 2 computing center. We are actively engaged in the analysis of ATLAS data from Run 1 and Run 2. Physics analyses we have contributed to include Standard Model measurements (W and Z cross sections, t\bar{t} differential cross sections, WWW^* production), evidence for the Higgs decaying to \tau^+\tau^-, and searches for new phenomena (technicolor, Z' and W', vector-like quarks, dark matter).

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Boston Univ., MA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Boston Univ., MA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), High Energy Physics (HEP) (SC-25)
OSTI Identifier:
1256931
Report Number(s):
DOE-BU-9882
DOE Contract Number:
SC0009882
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS

Citation Formats

Butler, John, Black, Kevin, and Ahlen, Steve. Energy Frontier Research With ATLAS: Final Report. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1256931.
Butler, John, Black, Kevin, & Ahlen, Steve. Energy Frontier Research With ATLAS: Final Report. United States. doi:10.2172/1256931.
Butler, John, Black, Kevin, and Ahlen, Steve. 2016. "Energy Frontier Research With ATLAS: Final Report". United States. doi:10.2172/1256931. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1256931.
@article{osti_1256931,
title = {Energy Frontier Research With ATLAS: Final Report},
author = {Butler, John and Black, Kevin and Ahlen, Steve},
abstractNote = {The Boston University (BU) group is playing key roles across the ATLAS experiment: in detector operations, the online trigger, the upgrade, computing, and physics analysis. Our team has been critical to the maintenance and operations of the muon system since its installation. During Run 1 we led the muon trigger group and that responsibility continues into Run 2. BU maintains and operates the ATLAS Northeast Tier 2 computing center. We are actively engaged in the analysis of ATLAS data from Run 1 and Run 2. Physics analyses we have contributed to include Standard Model measurements (W and Z cross sections, t\bar{t} differential cross sections, WWW^* production), evidence for the Higgs decaying to \tau^+\tau^-, and searches for new phenomena (technicolor, Z' and W', vector-like quarks, dark matter).},
doi = {10.2172/1256931},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}

Technical Report:

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