skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Methane Hydrate Formation in Ulleung Basin Under Conditions of Variable Salinity: Reduced Model and Experiments

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1256774
Grant/Contract Number:
FE00135331
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Transport in Porous Media
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 114; Journal Issue: 1; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2016-08-10 02:34:33; Journal ID: ISSN 0169-3913
Publisher:
Springer Science + Business Media
Country of Publication:
Netherlands
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Peszynska, Malgorzata, Hong, Wei-Li, Torres, Marta E., and Kim, Ji-Hoon. Methane Hydrate Formation in Ulleung Basin Under Conditions of Variable Salinity: Reduced Model and Experiments. Netherlands: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1007/s11242-016-0706-y.
Peszynska, Malgorzata, Hong, Wei-Li, Torres, Marta E., & Kim, Ji-Hoon. Methane Hydrate Formation in Ulleung Basin Under Conditions of Variable Salinity: Reduced Model and Experiments. Netherlands. doi:10.1007/s11242-016-0706-y.
Peszynska, Malgorzata, Hong, Wei-Li, Torres, Marta E., and Kim, Ji-Hoon. 2016. "Methane Hydrate Formation in Ulleung Basin Under Conditions of Variable Salinity: Reduced Model and Experiments". Netherlands. doi:10.1007/s11242-016-0706-y.
@article{osti_1256774,
title = {Methane Hydrate Formation in Ulleung Basin Under Conditions of Variable Salinity: Reduced Model and Experiments},
author = {Peszynska, Malgorzata and Hong, Wei-Li and Torres, Marta E. and Kim, Ji-Hoon},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1007/s11242-016-0706-y},
journal = {Transport in Porous Media},
number = 1,
volume = 114,
place = {Netherlands},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1007/s11242-016-0706-y

Save / Share:
  • The biogeochemical processes that occur in marine sediments on continental margins are complex; however, from one perspective they can be considered with respect to three geochemical zones based on the presence and form of methane: sulfate–methane transition (SMTZ), gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), and free gas zone (FGZ). These geochemical zones may harbor distinct microbial communities that are important in biogeochemical carbon cycles. The objective of this study was to describe the microbial communities in sediments from the SMTZ, GHSZ, and FGZ using molecular ecology methods (i.e. PhyloChip microarray analysis and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP)) and examining themore » results in the context of non-biological parameters in the sediments. Non-metric multidimensional scaling and multi-response permutation procedures were used to determine whether microbial community compositions were significantly different in the three geochemical zones and to correlate samples with abiotic characteristics of the sediments. This analysis indicated that microbial communities from all three zones were distinct from one another and that variables such as sulfate concentration, hydrate saturation of the nearest gas hydrate layer, and depth (or unmeasured variables associated with depth e.g. temperature, pressure) were correlated to differences between the three zones. The archaeal anaerobic methanotrophs typically attributed to performing anaerobic oxidation of methane were not detected in the SMTZ; however, the marine benthic group-B, which is often found in SMTZ, was detected. Within the GHSZ, samples that were typically closer to layers that contained higher hydrate saturation had indicator sequences related to Vibrio-type taxa. These results suggest that the biogeographic patterns of microbial communities in marine sediments are distinct based on geochemical zones defined by methane.« less
  • We present a kinetic model based upon pore water data collected from eight sites drilled during the second Ulleung Basin gas hydrate drilling expedition (UBGH2) in 2010. Three sites were drilled at locations where acoustic chimneys were identified in seismic data, and the rest were drilled on non-chimney (i.e. background) environments. Our model, coupled a comprehensive compositional and isotopic data set, is used to illustrate the different biogeochemical processes at play in those two environments, in terms of reactions around the sulfate-methane-transition-zone (SMTZ). Organic matter decomposition is an important process for production of methane, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and consumptionmore » of sulfate in the non-chimney sites, whereas anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) dominates both carbon and sulfur cycles in the chimney environment. Different sources of methane mediate AOM in the two settings. Internally produced methane through CO₂ reduction (CR) and methanogenesis fuels AOM in the non-chimney sites, whereas AOM is sustained by methane from external sources in the chimney sites. We also simulate the system evolution from non-chimney to chimney conditions by increasing the bottom methane supply to a non-chimney setting. We show that the higher CH₄ flux leads to a higher microbial activity of AOM, and more organic matter decomposition through methanogenesis. A higher methanogenesis rate and a smaller CR contribution relative to AOM in the chimney sites is responsible for the isotopically light DIC and heavy methane in this environment, relative to the non-chimney sites.« less
  • This paper provides new experimental data on the phase behavior of gas hydrates for several binary and ternary mixtures of methane, propane, isobutane, and n-butane. After the molecular Kihara parameters for n-butane in the thermodynamic model were tuned, the predictions were in good agreement with the experimental data. The role of n-butane formation is explained, and the effect of salinity on the phase behavior of binary mixtures of propane/n-butane is determined.