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Title: Sandia National Laboratories’ Cyber Tracer Program

Abstract

The Cyber Tracer Program at Sandia National Laboratories develops methods to prevent, counter and minimize cyber-attacks and protect valuable digital assets in the interest of national security.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SNL (Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Albuquerque, NM, and Livermore, CA (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1255811
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING; CYBER ATTACKS; CYBER DEFENSE; CYBER SECURITY; ADVERSARY; TRACER FIRE; SITUATIONAL AWARENESS; RECOIL

Citation Formats

Nauer, Kevin, Carbajal, Armida, Ta, Kim, Lee, Wellington, Galvin, Seanmichael, Mixon-Baca, Ben, Speed, Ann, and Obama, Barack. Sandia National Laboratories’ Cyber Tracer Program. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Nauer, Kevin, Carbajal, Armida, Ta, Kim, Lee, Wellington, Galvin, Seanmichael, Mixon-Baca, Ben, Speed, Ann, & Obama, Barack. Sandia National Laboratories’ Cyber Tracer Program. United States.
Nauer, Kevin, Carbajal, Armida, Ta, Kim, Lee, Wellington, Galvin, Seanmichael, Mixon-Baca, Ben, Speed, Ann, and Obama, Barack. Wed . "Sandia National Laboratories’ Cyber Tracer Program". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1255811.
@article{osti_1255811,
title = {Sandia National Laboratories’ Cyber Tracer Program},
author = {Nauer, Kevin and Carbajal, Armida and Ta, Kim and Lee, Wellington and Galvin, Seanmichael and Mixon-Baca, Ben and Speed, Ann and Obama, Barack},
abstractNote = {The Cyber Tracer Program at Sandia National Laboratories develops methods to prevent, counter and minimize cyber-attacks and protect valuable digital assets in the interest of national security.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
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