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Title: Design of a Multisensory Probe for Measuring Carbon Cycle Processes in Aqueous Subterranean Environments

Abstract

The global carbon cycle describes the exchange of carbon between the atmosphere, terrestrial vegetation, oceans, and soil. Mechanisms involving carbon in sub-terrestrial ecosystems and their impact on climate are not well understood. This lack of understanding limits current climate models and prevents accurate soil-carbon storage predications for future climate conditions. To address the lack of instrumentation for conducting high fidelity measurements of appropriate parameters in the field, a multi-sensory probe using a mix of optical, fiber optic, and electronic technologies to measure CO2, temperature, dissolved oxygen, redox potential, and water level in subsurface environments has been developed. Details of the design, fabrication and laboratory performance verification are presented. Use cases and the anticipated impacts of such measurements on climate models are discussed.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program
OSTI Identifier:
1255654
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: IEEE Southeast Con 2015, Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA, 20150409, 20150412
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

McIntyre, Timothy J, Kisner, Roger, Woodworth, Ken, Lenarduzzi, Roberto, Frank, Steven Shane, and McKnight, Timothy E. Design of a Multisensory Probe for Measuring Carbon Cycle Processes in Aqueous Subterranean Environments. United States: N. p., 2015. Web.
McIntyre, Timothy J, Kisner, Roger, Woodworth, Ken, Lenarduzzi, Roberto, Frank, Steven Shane, & McKnight, Timothy E. Design of a Multisensory Probe for Measuring Carbon Cycle Processes in Aqueous Subterranean Environments. United States.
McIntyre, Timothy J, Kisner, Roger, Woodworth, Ken, Lenarduzzi, Roberto, Frank, Steven Shane, and McKnight, Timothy E. Thu . "Design of a Multisensory Probe for Measuring Carbon Cycle Processes in Aqueous Subterranean Environments". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1255654,
title = {Design of a Multisensory Probe for Measuring Carbon Cycle Processes in Aqueous Subterranean Environments},
author = {McIntyre, Timothy J and Kisner, Roger and Woodworth, Ken and Lenarduzzi, Roberto and Frank, Steven Shane and McKnight, Timothy E},
abstractNote = {The global carbon cycle describes the exchange of carbon between the atmosphere, terrestrial vegetation, oceans, and soil. Mechanisms involving carbon in sub-terrestrial ecosystems and their impact on climate are not well understood. This lack of understanding limits current climate models and prevents accurate soil-carbon storage predications for future climate conditions. To address the lack of instrumentation for conducting high fidelity measurements of appropriate parameters in the field, a multi-sensory probe using a mix of optical, fiber optic, and electronic technologies to measure CO2, temperature, dissolved oxygen, redox potential, and water level in subsurface environments has been developed. Details of the design, fabrication and laboratory performance verification are presented. Use cases and the anticipated impacts of such measurements on climate models are discussed.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2015},
month = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2015}
}

Conference:
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