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Title: Mockup Small-Diameter Air Distribution System

Abstract

This report investigates the feasibility of using a home-run manifold small-diameter duct system to provide space conditioning air to individual thermal zones in a low-load home. This compact layout allows duct systems to be brought easily within conditioned space via interior partition walls. Centrally locating the air hander unit in the house significantly reduces duct lengths. The plenum box is designed so that each connected duct receives an equal amount of airflow, regardless of the duct position on the box. Furthermore, within a reasonable set of length restrictions, each duct continues to receive similar airflow. The design method uses an additive approach to reach the total needed zonal airflow. Once the cubic feet per minute needed to satisfy the thermal load of a zone has been determined, the total number of duct runs to a zone can be calculated by dividing the required airflow by the standard airflow from each duct. The additive approach greatly simplifies the design effort and reduces the potential for duct design mistakes to be made. Measured results indicate that this plenum design can satisfy the heating load. However, the total airflow falls short of satisfying the cooling load in a hypothetical building. Static pressure insidemore » the plenum box of 51.5 Pa limited the total airflow of the attached mini-split heat pump blower, thus limiting the total thermal capacity. Fan energy consumption is kept to 0.16 to 0.22 watt/CFM by using short duct runs and smooth duct material.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
IBACOS
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Building Technologies Office (EE-5B) (Building America)
OSTI Identifier:
1255645
Report Number(s):
DOE/GO-102016-4752
7410
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
residential; residential buildings; IBACOS; Building America; small-diameter ducts; high velocity; HVAC; air distribution; ducts in conditioned space; home-run manifold; low-load homes; mini-split heat pump

Citation Formats

A. Poerschke and A. Rudd. Mockup Small-Diameter Air Distribution System. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
A. Poerschke and A. Rudd. Mockup Small-Diameter Air Distribution System. United States.
A. Poerschke and A. Rudd. Sun . "Mockup Small-Diameter Air Distribution System". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1255645.
@article{osti_1255645,
title = {Mockup Small-Diameter Air Distribution System},
author = {A. Poerschke and A. Rudd},
abstractNote = {This report investigates the feasibility of using a home-run manifold small-diameter duct system to provide space conditioning air to individual thermal zones in a low-load home. This compact layout allows duct systems to be brought easily within conditioned space via interior partition walls. Centrally locating the air hander unit in the house significantly reduces duct lengths. The plenum box is designed so that each connected duct receives an equal amount of airflow, regardless of the duct position on the box. Furthermore, within a reasonable set of length restrictions, each duct continues to receive similar airflow. The design method uses an additive approach to reach the total needed zonal airflow. Once the cubic feet per minute needed to satisfy the thermal load of a zone has been determined, the total number of duct runs to a zone can be calculated by dividing the required airflow by the standard airflow from each duct. The additive approach greatly simplifies the design effort and reduces the potential for duct design mistakes to be made. Measured results indicate that this plenum design can satisfy the heating load. However, the total airflow falls short of satisfying the cooling load in a hypothetical building. Static pressure inside the plenum box of 51.5 Pa limited the total airflow of the attached mini-split heat pump blower, thus limiting the total thermal capacity. Fan energy consumption is kept to 0.16 to 0.22 watt/CFM by using short duct runs and smooth duct material.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Sun May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
  • This report investigates the feasibility of using a home-run manifold small-diameter duct system to provide space conditioning air to individual thermal zones in a low-load home. This compact layout allows duct systems to be brought easily within conditioned space via interior partition walls. Centrally locating the air hander unit in the house significantly reduces duct lengths. The plenum box is designed so that each connected duct receives an equal amount of airflow, regardless of the duct position on the box. Furthermore, within a reasonable set of length restrictions, each duct continues to receive similar airflow. The design method uses anmore » additive approach to reach the total needed zonal airflow. Once the cubic feet per minute needed to satisfy the thermal load of a zone has been determined, the total number of duct runs to a zone can be calculated by dividing the required airflow by the standard airflow from each duct. The additive approach greatly simplifies the design effort and reduces the potential for duct design mistakes to be made. Measured results indicate that this plenum design can satisfy the heating load. However, the total airflow falls short of satisfying the cooling load in a hypothetical building. Static pressure inside the plenum box of 51.5 Pa limited the total airflow of the attached mini-split heat pump blower, thus limiting the total thermal capacity. Fan energy consumption is kept to 0.16 to 0.22 watt/CFM by using short duct runs and smooth duct material.« less
  • This report investigates the feasibility of using a home-run manifold small-diameter duct system to provide space-conditioning air to individual thermal zones in a low-load home. This compact layout allows duct systems to easily be brought within conditioned space via interior partition walls. Centrally locating the air handling unit in the house significantly reduces duct lengths. The plenum box is designed so that each connected duct receives a similar amount of airflow—regardless of its position on the box. Furthermore, within a reasonable set of length restrictions each duct continues to receive similar airflow.
  • Measurements were completed in the Lid Tank on the short experiment to ald in the design of control-instrument plugs. The plug was designed to increase the thermalneutron flux locally in the water beyond the pressure shell. This was accomplished by penetrating the water reflector and the steel and water thermal shield with an 8-in. diameter steel pipe fllled with lead, steel, or air. The measurements are compared with those of the unperforated shield. Neutron measurements were taken in water along the axis of the plug and also along the line perpendicular to and intersecting the plug axis. Gamma measurements weremore » taken beyond the air-filled plug only. Neutroninduced secondary rays are predominant in determining the attenuation rate of the pressnre shell. (D.E.B.)« less
  • This report investigates the feasibility of using a home-run manifold small-diameter duct system to provide space conditioning air to individual thermal zones in a low-load home. This compact layout allows duct systems to be brought easily within conditioned space via interior partition walls. Centrally locating the air handler unit in the house significantly reduces duct lengths. The plenum box is designed so that each connected duct receives an equal amount of airflow, regardless of the duct position on the box. Furthermore, within a reasonable set of length restrictions, each duct continues to receive similar airflow. The design method uses anmore » additive approach to reach the total needed zonal airflow. Once the cubic feet per minute needed to satisfy the thermal load of a zone has been determined, the total number of duct runs to a zone can be calculated by dividing the required airflow by the standard airflow from each duct. The additive approach greatly simplifies the design effort and reduces the potential for duct design mistakes to be made. Measured results indicate that this plenum design can satisfy the heating load. However, the total airflow falls short of satisfying the cooling load in a hypothetical building. Static pressure inside the plenum box of 51.5 Pa limited the total airflow of the attached mini-split heat pump blower, thus limiting the total thermal capacity. Fan energy consumption is kept to 0.16 to 0.22 watt/CFM by using short duct runs and smooth duct material.« less
  • Work performed during Fiscal 1985 in the area of thermal distribution systems in buildings is reported. This area includes the systems used to distribute heat and cooling throughout a building, and it also addresses the optimal utilization of these systems to minimize energy use, for example through zoning. The report covers assessment tasks on thermal losses in forced-air distribution systems, zoning in residences with forced-air distribution systems, hydronic and radiant systems, national energy-use impacts, and the preparation of a ten-year research and development plan.