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Title: KIVA-hpFE. Predictive turbulent reactive and multiphase flow in engines - An Overview

Abstract

Research and development of KIVA-hpFE for turbulent reactive and multiphase flow particularly as related to engine modeling program has relevance to National energy security and climate change. Climate change is a source problem, and energy national security is consumption of petroleum products problem. Accurately predicting engine processes leads to, lower greenhouse gas (GHG) emission, where engines in the transportation sector currently account for 26% of the U.S. GHG emissions. Less dependence on petroleum products leads to greater energy security. By Environmental Protection Agency standards, some vehicles are now reaching 42 to the 50 mpg mark. These are conventional gasoline engines. Continued investment and research into new technical innovations, the potential exists to save more than 4 million barrels of oil per day or approximately $200 to $400 million per day. This would be a significant decrease in emission and use of petroleum and a very large economic stimulus too! It is estimated with further advancements in combustion, the current emissions can be reduced up to 40%. Enabling better understanding of fuel injection and fuel-air mixing, thermodynamic combustion losses, and combustion/emission formation processes enhances our ability to help solve both problems. To provide adequate capability for accurately simulating these processes, minimizemore » time and labor for development of engine technology, are the goals of our KIVA development program.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1254246
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-16-23624
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; Computer Science; Energy Sciences; Mathematics

Citation Formats

Carrington, David Bradley. KIVA-hpFE. Predictive turbulent reactive and multiphase flow in engines - An Overview. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1254246.
Carrington, David Bradley. KIVA-hpFE. Predictive turbulent reactive and multiphase flow in engines - An Overview. United States. doi:10.2172/1254246.
Carrington, David Bradley. 2016. "KIVA-hpFE. Predictive turbulent reactive and multiphase flow in engines - An Overview". United States. doi:10.2172/1254246. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1254246.
@article{osti_1254246,
title = {KIVA-hpFE. Predictive turbulent reactive and multiphase flow in engines - An Overview},
author = {Carrington, David Bradley},
abstractNote = {Research and development of KIVA-hpFE for turbulent reactive and multiphase flow particularly as related to engine modeling program has relevance to National energy security and climate change. Climate change is a source problem, and energy national security is consumption of petroleum products problem. Accurately predicting engine processes leads to, lower greenhouse gas (GHG) emission, where engines in the transportation sector currently account for 26% of the U.S. GHG emissions. Less dependence on petroleum products leads to greater energy security. By Environmental Protection Agency standards, some vehicles are now reaching 42 to the 50 mpg mark. These are conventional gasoline engines. Continued investment and research into new technical innovations, the potential exists to save more than 4 million barrels of oil per day or approximately $200 to $400 million per day. This would be a significant decrease in emission and use of petroleum and a very large economic stimulus too! It is estimated with further advancements in combustion, the current emissions can be reduced up to 40%. Enabling better understanding of fuel injection and fuel-air mixing, thermodynamic combustion losses, and combustion/emission formation processes enhances our ability to help solve both problems. To provide adequate capability for accurately simulating these processes, minimize time and labor for development of engine technology, are the goals of our KIVA development program.},
doi = {10.2172/1254246},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 5
}

Technical Report:

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  • Research and development of KIVA-hpFE for turbulent reactive and multiphase flow particularly as related to engine modeling program has relevance to National energy security and climate change. Climate change is a source problem, and energy national security is consumption of petroleum products problem. Accurately predicting engine processes leads to, lower greenhouse gas (GHG) emission, where engines in the transportation sector currently account for 26% of the U.S. GHG emissions. Less dependence on petroleum products leads to greater energy security. By Environmental Protection Agency standards, some vehicles are now reaching 42 to the 50 mpg mark. These are conventional gasoline engines.more » Continued investment and research into new technical innovations, the potential exists to save more than 4 million barrels of oil per day or approximately $200 to $400 million per day. This would be a significant decrease in emission and use of petroleum and a very large economic stimulus too! It is estimated with further advancements in combustion, the current emissions can be reduced up to 40%. Enabling better understanding of fuel injection and fuel-air mixing, thermodynamic combustion losses, and combustion/emission formation processes enhances our ability to help solve both problems. To provide adequate capability for accurately simulating these processes, minimize time and labor for development of engine technology, are the goals of our KIVA development program.« less
  • This is the final report of a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of the project was to develop a self-sustained research program for advanced computer simulation of industrial reactive multiphase flows. The prototype research problem was a three-phase alumina precipitator used in the Bayer process, a key step in aluminum refining. Accomplishments included the development of an improved reaction mechanism of the alumina precipitation growth process, the development of an efficient methods for handling particle size distribution in multiphase flow simulation codes, the incorporation of precipitation growth and agglomerationmore » kinetics in LANL's CFDLIB multiphase flow code library and the evaluation of multiphase turbulence closure models for bubbly flow simulations.« less
  • This is the final report of a proposed three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project was terminated after the first year due to changes in funding priorities. The objective of the project was to develop a self-sustained research program for advanced computer simulation of industrial reactive multiphase flows. The prototype research problem was a three-phase alumina precipitator used in the Bayer process, a key step in aluminum refining. Accomplishments in the first year included the development of an improved reaction mechanism of the alumina precipitation growth process, the development of anmore » efficient method for handling particle size distribution in multiphase flow simulation codes and finally the incorporation of precipitation growth and agglomeration kinetics in LANL`s CFDLIB multiphase flow code library.« less
  • This report discusses some specifics of the HPC Institutional Computing Project at LANL.