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Title: Metal intercalation-induced selective adatom mass transport on graphene

Abstract

Recent experiments indicate that metal intercalation is a very effective method to manipulate the graphene-adatom interaction and control metal nanostructure formation on graphene. A key question is mass transport, i.e., how atoms deposited uniformly on graphene populate different areas depending on the local intercalation. Using first-principles calculations, we show that partially intercalated graphene, with a mixture of intercalated and pristine areas, can induce an alternating electric field because of the spatial variations in electron doping, and thus, an oscillatory electrostatic potential. As a result, this alternating field can change normal stochastic adatom diffusion to biased diffusion, leading to selective mass transport and consequent nucleation, on either the intercalated or pristine areas, depending on the charge state of the adatoms.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [2];  [2];  [2]
  1. Northeast Normal Univ., Changchun (China)
  2. Ames Lab. and Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)
  3. Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing (China)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ames Laboratory (AMES), Ames, IA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1253759
Report Number(s):
IS-J-8957
Journal ID: ISSN 1998-0124; PII: 1039
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-07CH11358
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nano Research
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 9; Journal Issue: 5; Journal ID: ISSN 1998-0124
Publisher:
Springer
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; graphene; intercalation; electrostatic potential; selective adsorption; first-principle calculation

Citation Formats

Liu, Xiaojie, Wang, Cai -Zhuang, Hupalo, Myron, Lin, Hai -Qing, Ho, Kai -Ming, Thiel, Patricia A., and Tringides, Michael C.. Metal intercalation-induced selective adatom mass transport on graphene. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1007/s12274-016-1039-4.
Liu, Xiaojie, Wang, Cai -Zhuang, Hupalo, Myron, Lin, Hai -Qing, Ho, Kai -Ming, Thiel, Patricia A., & Tringides, Michael C.. Metal intercalation-induced selective adatom mass transport on graphene. United States. doi:10.1007/s12274-016-1039-4.
Liu, Xiaojie, Wang, Cai -Zhuang, Hupalo, Myron, Lin, Hai -Qing, Ho, Kai -Ming, Thiel, Patricia A., and Tringides, Michael C.. Tue . "Metal intercalation-induced selective adatom mass transport on graphene". United States. doi:10.1007/s12274-016-1039-4. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1253759.
@article{osti_1253759,
title = {Metal intercalation-induced selective adatom mass transport on graphene},
author = {Liu, Xiaojie and Wang, Cai -Zhuang and Hupalo, Myron and Lin, Hai -Qing and Ho, Kai -Ming and Thiel, Patricia A. and Tringides, Michael C.},
abstractNote = {Recent experiments indicate that metal intercalation is a very effective method to manipulate the graphene-adatom interaction and control metal nanostructure formation on graphene. A key question is mass transport, i.e., how atoms deposited uniformly on graphene populate different areas depending on the local intercalation. Using first-principles calculations, we show that partially intercalated graphene, with a mixture of intercalated and pristine areas, can induce an alternating electric field because of the spatial variations in electron doping, and thus, an oscillatory electrostatic potential. As a result, this alternating field can change normal stochastic adatom diffusion to biased diffusion, leading to selective mass transport and consequent nucleation, on either the intercalated or pristine areas, depending on the charge state of the adatoms.},
doi = {10.1007/s12274-016-1039-4},
journal = {Nano Research},
number = 5,
volume = 9,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Mar 29 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Tue Mar 29 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

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