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Title: High temperature thermoplastic elastomers synthesized by living anionic polymerization in hydrocarbon solvent at room temperature

Abstract

We present the synthesis and characterization of a new class of high temperature thermoplastic elastomers composed of polybenzofulvene–polyisoprene–polybenzofulvene (FIF) triblock copolymers. All copolymers were prepared by living anionic polymerization in benzene at room temperature. Homopolymerization and effects of additives on the glass transition temperature (T g) of polybenzofulvene (PBF) were also investigated. Among all triblock copolymers studied, FIF with 14 vol % of PBF exhibited a maximum stress of 14.3 ± 1.3 MPa and strain at break of 1390 ± 66% from tensile tests. The stress–strain curves of FIF-10 and 14 were analyzed by a statistical molecular approach using a nonaffine tube model to estimate the thermoplastic elastomer behavior. Dynamic mechanical analysis showed that the softening temperature of PBF in FIF was 145 °C, much higher than that of thermoplastic elastomers with polystyrene hard blocks. Microphase separation of FIF triblock copolymers was observed by small-angle X-ray scattering, even though long-range order was not achieved under the annealing conditions employed. Additionally, the microphase separation of the resulting triblock copolymers was examined by atomic force microscopy.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [4];  [2];  [2];  [5];  [6];  [4];  [7];  [4];  [4]
  1. Fraunhofer-Institut fur Mikrostruktur con Werkstoffen und Systemen IMWS, Halle (Germany)
  2. Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)
  3. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  4. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)
  5. Fraunhofer-Institut fur Werkstoffmechanik (Fraunhofer IWM), Germany
  6. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  7. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1253243
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Macromolecules
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 49; Journal Issue: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 0024-9297
Publisher:
American Chemical Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Schlegel, Ralf, Williams, Katherine, Voyloy, Dimitry, Steren, Carlos A., Goodwin, Andrew, Coughlin, E. Bryan, Gido, Samuel, Beiner, Mario, Hong, Kunlun, Kang, Nam -Goo, Mays, Jimmy, Wang, Weiyu, and White, Benjamin T. High temperature thermoplastic elastomers synthesized by living anionic polymerization in hydrocarbon solvent at room temperature. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.macromol.5b02642.
Schlegel, Ralf, Williams, Katherine, Voyloy, Dimitry, Steren, Carlos A., Goodwin, Andrew, Coughlin, E. Bryan, Gido, Samuel, Beiner, Mario, Hong, Kunlun, Kang, Nam -Goo, Mays, Jimmy, Wang, Weiyu, & White, Benjamin T. High temperature thermoplastic elastomers synthesized by living anionic polymerization in hydrocarbon solvent at room temperature. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.macromol.5b02642.
Schlegel, Ralf, Williams, Katherine, Voyloy, Dimitry, Steren, Carlos A., Goodwin, Andrew, Coughlin, E. Bryan, Gido, Samuel, Beiner, Mario, Hong, Kunlun, Kang, Nam -Goo, Mays, Jimmy, Wang, Weiyu, and White, Benjamin T. 2016. "High temperature thermoplastic elastomers synthesized by living anionic polymerization in hydrocarbon solvent at room temperature". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.macromol.5b02642. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1253243.
@article{osti_1253243,
title = {High temperature thermoplastic elastomers synthesized by living anionic polymerization in hydrocarbon solvent at room temperature},
author = {Schlegel, Ralf and Williams, Katherine and Voyloy, Dimitry and Steren, Carlos A. and Goodwin, Andrew and Coughlin, E. Bryan and Gido, Samuel and Beiner, Mario and Hong, Kunlun and Kang, Nam -Goo and Mays, Jimmy and Wang, Weiyu and White, Benjamin T.},
abstractNote = {We present the synthesis and characterization of a new class of high temperature thermoplastic elastomers composed of polybenzofulvene–polyisoprene–polybenzofulvene (FIF) triblock copolymers. All copolymers were prepared by living anionic polymerization in benzene at room temperature. Homopolymerization and effects of additives on the glass transition temperature (Tg) of polybenzofulvene (PBF) were also investigated. Among all triblock copolymers studied, FIF with 14 vol % of PBF exhibited a maximum stress of 14.3 ± 1.3 MPa and strain at break of 1390 ± 66% from tensile tests. The stress–strain curves of FIF-10 and 14 were analyzed by a statistical molecular approach using a nonaffine tube model to estimate the thermoplastic elastomer behavior. Dynamic mechanical analysis showed that the softening temperature of PBF in FIF was 145 °C, much higher than that of thermoplastic elastomers with polystyrene hard blocks. Microphase separation of FIF triblock copolymers was observed by small-angle X-ray scattering, even though long-range order was not achieved under the annealing conditions employed. Additionally, the microphase separation of the resulting triblock copolymers was examined by atomic force microscopy.},
doi = {10.1021/acs.macromol.5b02642},
journal = {Macromolecules},
number = 7,
volume = 49,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 3
}

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