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Title: Design of a Vestibular Prosthesis for Sensation of Gravitoinertial Acceleration 1

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1252612
Report Number(s):
LLNL-CONF-678996
Journal ID: ISSN 1932-6181
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Medical Devices; Journal Volume: 10; Journal Issue: 3; Conference: Presented at: ASME Design of Medical Devices, Minneapolis, MN, United States, Apr 11 - Apr 14, 2016
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 42 ENGINEERING

Citation Formats

Hageman, Kristin N., Chow, Margaret R., Boutros, Peter J., Roberts, Dale, Tooker, Angela, Lee, Kye, Felix, Sarah, Pannu, Satinderpall S., and Della Santina, Charles C.. Design of a Vestibular Prosthesis for Sensation of Gravitoinertial Acceleration 1. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1115/1.4033759.
Hageman, Kristin N., Chow, Margaret R., Boutros, Peter J., Roberts, Dale, Tooker, Angela, Lee, Kye, Felix, Sarah, Pannu, Satinderpall S., & Della Santina, Charles C.. Design of a Vestibular Prosthesis for Sensation of Gravitoinertial Acceleration 1. United States. doi:10.1115/1.4033759.
Hageman, Kristin N., Chow, Margaret R., Boutros, Peter J., Roberts, Dale, Tooker, Angela, Lee, Kye, Felix, Sarah, Pannu, Satinderpall S., and Della Santina, Charles C.. 2016. "Design of a Vestibular Prosthesis for Sensation of Gravitoinertial Acceleration 1". United States. doi:10.1115/1.4033759. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1252612.
@article{osti_1252612,
title = {Design of a Vestibular Prosthesis for Sensation of Gravitoinertial Acceleration 1},
author = {Hageman, Kristin N. and Chow, Margaret R. and Boutros, Peter J. and Roberts, Dale and Tooker, Angela and Lee, Kye and Felix, Sarah and Pannu, Satinderpall S. and Della Santina, Charles C.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1115/1.4033759},
journal = {Journal of Medical Devices},
number = 3,
volume = 10,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Conference:
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